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Old 05-08-2012, 08:40 PM   #1
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After The Government Microchips Our Soldiers, How Long Will It Be

http://www.activistpost.com/2012/05/...chips-our.html

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After The Government Microchips Our Soldiers, How Long Will It Be Before They Want To Put A Microchip In YOU

What would you do if someday the government made it mandatory for everyone to receive an implantable microchip for identification purposes? Would you take it? Such a scenario may not be as far off as you might think. In the United States today, millions of dogs and cats have been microchipped, thousands of elderly Americans with Alzheimer's disease have been microchipped, and the U.S. military is developing "medical devices" that contain microchips to monitor the health of soldiers. Once the government has microchips implanted in all of our soldiers, how long will it be before they want to put a microchip in all government employees for the sake of national security? Once the government has microchips in all government employees, how long will it be before they want to put a microchip in you? Of course this technology is not going to be "required" for average citizens any time soon. For now, it will creep into our lives at an incremental pace. But after enough people have voluntarily accepted the "benefits" of implantable microchips, it will only be a matter of time before they become mandatory. Are you ready for that?

The plan to implant U.S. soldiers with implantable microchips was detailed in a recent article by Kate Knibbs....

The U.S. military plans to implant soldiers with medical devices, making them harder to kill with diseases.

The military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, announced plans to create nanosensors that monitor soldiers' health on the battlefield and keep doctors constantly abreast about potential health problems.
These technological "advances" are usually promoted in such a way that makes it difficult for the average citizen to get angry about them. After all, who could be against keeping our soldiers alive and healthy?

But as they say, the path to hell was paved with good intentions. It turns out that researches at Stanford University are also busy developing similar technology for the general public....

Nanotechnology continues to find a place in the medical field as well. Stanford University researchers are developing tiny robotic monitors that can diagnose illnesses, monitor vital stats and even deliver medicine into the bloodstream, similar to the devices that the military plans to create. The two projects have yet to link up, but their similar goals suggest the military could benefit from coordinating efforts with leading university scientists.
Would you let them put a microchip inside of you if it would supposedly keep you healthier?

As this kind of technology becomes more widespread, people will be told that they don't want to "miss out" on the great benefits that it provides.

The spread of implantable microchips is going to mostly be voluntary for right now. Large numbers of Americans have already taken them, and that number is going to greatly increase in the years ahead.

A recent WND article contained some quotes from privacy expert Katherine Albrecht about how the widespread adoption of implantable microchips will primarily be through voluntary methods....

“It’s never going to happen that the government at gunpoint says, ‘You’re going to have a tracking chip,’” said Katherine Albrecht, who with Liz McIntyre authored “Spychips,” a book that warns of the threat to privacy posed by Radio Frequency Identification.

“It’s always in incremental steps. If you can put a microchip in someone that doesn’t track them … everybody looks and says, ‘Come on,’” she said. “It’ll be interesting seeing where we go.”
As this technology spreads, it will become much easier for various institutions to start making it a requirement.

For example, what happens someday if your employer requires you to get an implantable microchip for security reasons?

What happens someday if your bank requires you to get an implantable microchip in order to use your bank account?

Don't think that it can't happen.

All over the globe, there is an obsession with making "identity" more secure.

Just check out what is going on in India according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation....

In India, a massive effort is underway to collect biometric identity information for each of the country’s 1.2 billion people. The incredible plan, dubbed the “mother of all e-governance projects” by the Economic Times,has stirred controversy in India and beyond, raising serious concerns about the privacy and security of individuals’ personal data.

The plan is moving ahead at a clip under the auspices of the National Population Register (NPR) and the Unique ID (UID) programs, separately governed initiatives that have an agreement to integrate the data they collect to build the world’s largest biometric database. Upon enrollment, individuals are issued 12-digit unique ID numbers on chip-based identity cards. For residents who lack the necessary paperwork to obtain certain kinds of employment or government services, there’s strong incentive to get a unique ID. While the UID program is voluntary, enrollment in the NPR program is mandatory for all citizens.
How long do you think it will be before even more countries develop their own "Unique ID" programs?

We will be told that such programs are necessary to prevent identity fraud, to track criminals and terrorists, to crack down on tax evaders and to strengthen "national security".

The thing with a card is that it can always be lost, stolen or forged.

It seems inevitable that governments around the world will want something even more "secure" than a card at some point.

So will you allow the government to inject your "identity card" into your hand when the time comes?

But not all of these advanced microchips will be implantable.

As I have written about previously, some scientists are working on developing "edible microchips". These edible microchips would be used by doctors to monitor your health. The following description of these edible microchips comes from a recent article in the Daily Mail....

The sensor, which contains no battery, antenna or radio, creates a unique digital signature that is picked up and recorded by a patch attached to the patient's shoulder.

The patch, which also monitors bodily functions such as heart rate and temperature, sends this encrypted information to blue-tooth enabled smartphones or computers owned by the patient and their doctors and carers.

In this way, both patients and their doctors can work out exactly which pills have been taken. Medics can also interpret whether the patient is sleeping well, or taking enough exercise using the information transmitted from the patch.
Would you take an "edible microchip" if it would help your doctor take better care of you?

Other people will want to take implantable microchips because it will enable them to become more "connected" to our technology grid.

For example, if it was possible would you connect your brain directly to the Internet?

It may not be as far off as you might think. An article on the website of the Science Channel recently asked the following question....

What if it were possible to connect your brain to the Internet, either wirelessly or through a cable, download digital information at high speed, and then translate it automatically into a chemical form that could be stored by your brain cells as memory?
That same article explained that the benefits of directly connecting our brains to the Internet could be absolutely amazing....

If you could pump data directly into your gray matter at, say, 50 mbps — the top speed offered by one major U.S. internet service provider — you’d be able to read a 500-page book in just under two-tenths of a second.
But wouldn't connecting your brain to the Internet also be incredibly dangerous?

Couldn't someone download "viruses" directly into your brain?

Couldn't someone find a way to "control" your brain remotely?

New technologies always bring new dangers with them.

We will be sold on the "benefits" of implantable microchips, but the public will rarely be told about the potential dangers.

Right now, there are millions of dogs and cats all over the country that have been injected with microchips. In fact, some American cities are actually making it mandatory to get your pets microchipped. We are told that this makes it much easier to return lost pets to their owners.

All over America, implantable microchips are being injected into thousands of elderly Americans living with Alzheimer's disease. We are told that this makes it much easier to find them if they wander off and get lost.

But what are the dangers?

What would happen if a totalitarian government started requiring that all citizens have their "identities" put on a microchip and implanted into them?

It would certainly make it easier for a "Big Brother" government to watch, monitor and track everyone.

And it would become nearly impossible to live a normal life without getting an implant.

What would you do if you could not get a bank account without a microchip?

What would you do if you could not go shopping without a microchip?

What would you do if you could not get a job without a microchip?

What would you do if you could not conduct a single financial transaction without a microchip?

How would you live?

Certainly most people would be very tempted to take the microchip so that they could take care of their families and lead fairly normal lives.

Those that rebelled and didn't take the microchip would be ostracized and would be considered enemies of the state. They would be hunted down and hauled off to prison.

Don't think that such a scenario is impossible.

Just think about how our society has changed in recent years. It has become more like a giant prison every single day.

At some point in the future, implantable microchip technology will be used for nefarious purposes.

What will you do when that day arrives?

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Old 05-08-2012, 11:40 PM   #2
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I enjoyed your post/link.

I believe that people are being tuned into the idea that they can 'see' these technologies through something as simple as a 30 second montage in a popular movie or TV show and be made to believe the 'good' could outweigh the 'bad' given little to NO context. I am not an advocate of RFID/microchip implantation, but what I'm trying to say is that people with such glitzy examples such as Minority Report's could be made to think "That may not be so bad"... without thinking of the unintended consequences.

I don't watch much TV.... not much to say how that medium is influencing what people see in terms of these advances in technology and how palatable they are to mass audiences.


Quote :
The military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, announced plans to create nanosensors that monitor soldiers' health on the battlefield and keep doctors constantly abreast about potential health problems.
...FICTIONAL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metal_Gear_Solid

A nanoengineered virus in a fictional video game storyline:http://metalgear.wikia.com/wiki/FOXDIE

The Metal Gear Solid Series is over 20 years old, has sold more than 30 million copies (of the various games in the entire series), and features a plot so convoluted and technologically baffling at times that it makes FOX's "24" feel like the Sunday funnies page (maybe not a good comparison, but I thought "24" ripped off a lot of MGS sub-plots...) The MGS series focuses heavily on nanotechnology in soldiers and officers, the President, key Cabinet members, etc in two of the game's installments. I've enjoyed the series, and really identify with quite a few of the concepts covered in the article because of it. I haven't read much science fiction in the last 10 years, would be my excuse...

Quote :
What would you do if you could not go shopping without a microchip?

Quote :
...you’d be able to read a 500-page book in just under two-tenths of a second.
(Funny...)


While I don't really have a better single source to talk about what the article is approaching here with microchips, identification, human-machine interface and monitoring/tracking - the concept of "singularity" pops into my head, and I was thinking maybe this was a subject you had read about as well.

Another place where Singularity junkies hang out and post all sorts of related articles and news: http://singularityhub.com/

It's all about political will and unintended consequences... *sigh*



Last one: A straight-to-DVD release of a movie concept that includes an implantable chip that records all of what you see, for your entire life. "The Final Cut" starring Robin Williams and Mira Sorvino. Wild concept...(preview is a bit over-the-top for how mellow the movie turns out to be).

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Old 05-09-2012, 05:43 AM   #3
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Old 05-09-2012, 08:20 AM   #4
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No computing device in my possession can be made safe from attack or hack. Period. This is very well accepted in the security community.

Since the human body is practically immune from EMP - you can always fry it. But...since the tech is well known and mainstream, what's to keep me from cracking the tech and substituting my own - and even selling it to people for a price? Answer, nothing, if I have the ability to do so.

Sure, they can use some crypto to make that more difficult, but that's only in degree, and with some old NSA techniques, impossible for them to truly hide the required key...If you have a chip in hand, you can actually direct-read the content of every bit and gate...it's painful, but...very very possible and quite a few people already have the required toolage to do so.

Things like this get my entrepreneur nerves tingling...
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:56 AM   #5
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Impossible to either mandate or implement. The outcry would be so loud as to drown out all other discussion.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:21 AM   #6
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No one ever went broke overestimating human stupidity, however.

All they'd have to do is show some "iBling" advantage to it - instant passports would turn some people on, or how about point of sale - no credit card or even a phone-swipe needed? Some incentive would get some people to adopt and more would follow till it became uncool not to have one, if they did it right. Only then does it start the creep down the slippery slope into the applications we fear for it.

Look how they weaned people off nice, safe, convenient, private cash into CC's so they could skim a few percent off the top of every transaction, and now people will hardly even take a check, even though it costs them less and is easier to verify on the spot with the right gear. Or going back a step - how they got people into FRN's instead of PM's as money - the pulled out the gold backing in '71, quite awhile later on when no one could do anything much about that.
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:25 AM   #7
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This seems rather appropriate here:

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Old 05-09-2012, 03:49 PM   #8
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I guess you are right DC. This could be done with those "little pushes" the democrats like so much.
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Old 05-09-2012, 04:06 PM   #9
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There are times I'd rather not be right. This is one.

But I feel like it won't happen for a long time, due to the inherent hackability of anything I can take into some private place and play with to my heart's content.

As all the failed DRM schemes prove - you can't really make it work against a determined adversary, which I would surely be in that case, along with a few tens of thousands of my brothers in tech.

Even banks have alarms along with the safes. They know that given enough time, nothing is unbreakable, so they have backups on the backups - humans in this case.
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Old 05-09-2012, 06:12 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by DCFusor View Post:
No computing device in my possession can be made safe from attack or hack. Period. This is very well accepted in the security community.

Things like this get my entrepreneur nerves tingling...
Agree with you there DC. If this did go down, you would surely have a big clientele with your ideas. The sad thought lies in the likelyhood that the other 95-99% of people would go along with the subject of this thread willingly.

Originally Posted by ancona :
Impossible to either mandate or implement. The outcry would be so loud as to drown out all other discussion.
Originally Posted by DCFusor View Post:
No one ever went broke overestimating human stupidity, however.

Look how they weaned people off nice, safe, convenient, private cash into CC's so they could skim a few percent off the top of every transaction, and now people will hardly even take a check, even though it costs them less and is easier to verify on the spot with the right gear. Or going back a step - how they got people into FRN's instead of PM's as money - the pulled out the gold backing in '71, quite awhile later on when no one could do anything much about that.
Adding to what DC said, the masses generally gladly accept almost anything that is shoveled out to them if it is for their safety, convenience, entertainment or comfort.... especially when it is fertilized by the mass media.

In addition to DC's examples, hare a few more examples of things that would likely have been shot down if the underlying premise was forced on people instead of given to them in a way that "improves their lives":

Goal: To surveil the general public's daily activities and map out their social and family ties.
Method: Facebook.

Goal: To get facial recognition files on people, with names attached.
Method: Facebook; the facebook users do all the work by tagging faces in their photos.

Goal: To get a camera in every home.
Method: Probably happening very soon on a mass basis via TV.

Goal: To get a GPS track on a person's location.
Method: Cell phones.

Goal: To get inside a person's head and know their thoughts.
Method: Google search entries; online activity.

Goal: Get people to eat crap rather than good whole foods.
Method: Supermarkets, fast food restaurants, and the mass food industry. Up until about <100 years ago, people ate whole foods for thousands of years.

Goal: Keep real statesmen out of office; maintain puppet politicians in office.
Method: The illusion of a two-party system.

And the list goes on. All of the above is prodded along by the mass media. I too hope it doesn't come to this, but unless the general masses wake up, it is coming their way, and they will buy it hook, line and sinker. But no one from the Bug of course!

Oh, and the type of people below are sure bets for the chip, so they won't get lost.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=cd34HgqA-WY
The above link did not embed???
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Old 05-09-2012, 06:51 PM   #11
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Damn!!

Well thought out and well presented Unobtanium.

People have been taught to be such sheep that they follow the fucking herd on EVERYTHING!!! I guess I underestimeate the human condition a little because I am so [personally anyway] analytical about everything. But, you are right. Just look at all the idiots that bought Pet Rocks for Christ's sake!
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:00 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by ancona View Post:

Just look at all the idiots that bought Pet Rocks for Christ's sake!
And Chia Pets.
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:27 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Spiralpiece View Post:
While I don't really have a better single source to talk about what the article is approaching here with microchips, identification, human-machine interface and monitoring/tracking - the concept of "singularity" pops into my head, and I was thinking maybe this was a subject you had read about as well.

Another place where Singularity junkies hang out and post all sorts of related articles and news: http://singularityhub.com/
I have read a little about singularity, but not a lot. Sounds like an interesting topic. I am more familiar in terms of singularity as it relates to the Fibonacci Spiral, seen in nature and in some financial analyses. Also some would consider a SHTF scenario a singularity of sorts.

With regard to your videos, there is a term called Predictive Programming, where Hollywood produces movies to steer the public in a direction as protrayed by the movies (creating the future social structure, in a way); also to prepare peoples' psyches for things that they want to bring about in a way that it will not shock the public.

Most of us would agree that the technology in the Black Ops realm is a decade or decades ahead of the average public consumer technology. Some of what we see in movies can be assumed to be here already, albeit not publicized yet.
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Old 05-09-2012, 09:19 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Unobtanium View Post:
I too hope it doesn't come to this, but unless the general masses wake up, it is coming their way, and they will buy it hook, line and sinker.
Did someone say sheep?

Quote :
450 sheep jump to their deaths in Turkey

ISTANBUL, Turkey (AP) — First one sheep jumped to its death. Then stunned Turkish shepherds, who had left the herd to graze while they had breakfast, watched as nearly 1,500 others followed, each leaping off the same cliff, Turkish media reported.

In the end, 450 dead animals lay on top of one another in a billowy white pile, the Aksam newspaper said. Those who jumped later were saved as the pile got higher and the fall more cushioned, Aksam reported.

"There's nothing we can do. They're all wasted," Nevzat Bayhan, a member of one of 26 families whose sheep were grazing together in the herd, was quoted as saying by Aksam.

The estimated loss to families in the town of Gevas, located in Van province in eastern Turkey, tops $100,000, a significant amount of money in a country where average GDP per head is around $2,700.

"Every family had an average of 20 sheep," Aksam quoted another villager, Abdullah Hazar as saying. "But now only a few families have sheep left. It's going to be hard for us."
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Old 05-09-2012, 10:47 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Unobtanium View Post:
...
Goal: To get a camera in every home.
Method: Probably happening very soon on a mass basis via TV.
...
XBOX 360 Kinect. Also, can't iPhone and iPad cameras be activated remotely?
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:26 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by PMBug View Post:
Also, can't iPhone and iPad cameras be activated remotely?
I think so, and I think the microphone as well. It would be nice if a techie could confirm this, and if so, you could be seen AND heard via remote activation.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:47 AM   #17
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Samsung actually did announce a TV design with a camera in it that they claimed would subsidize the price of the TV via allowing advertisers to see how you really live.
There was serious outrage in the techie world, and there's been no adoption.

Anything with computer + camera can be remote activated if you can root it with various malware. There was that court case of a school in Penn getting busted for doing so with laptops they lent to students getting a few racy pix of them doing things at home. In this case, the malware was pre installed by the school. No one really got busted for it, but they stopped the program.

The FBI has been known to activate (or have it done) OnStar in cars to listen. There is considerable online info on how to stop that (it takes pulling two fuses).

Realistically, it's already here - if they want you, they have you. As long as we don't organize so we can easily be locally outnumbered and defeated in detail, it will be that way forever. This is why the internet monitoring is going on - to prevent a local version of "Arab Spring" flash mobs organized all too easily through this medium.
Easy if you nip it in the bud. Twitter is currently in court trying to get out of a subpoena for their user info about Occupy Wall Street participants.

They are getting around the wiretapping laws by using computers to do speech to text, and then claiming reading the text doesn't break the laws. The FBI is getting pissed that they don't yet have backdoors (they claim) into some of the major social services.

It's over for your privacy and has been for awhile. You don't have to have a facebook account and be stupid with it for that to be true - your "friends" will reveal plenty about you and they mine that too.

The only amelioration is to stay under the radar just so - obviously avoiding things makes you more visible (why is this guy's file so small? Interesting!). Just be so boring the algo's don't trip on you, or trip on you less than a lot of other people, because in the end, it still takes a human to decide to do something about all that data.

The net result is the criminalization of everyone as a means to have something to hold over you - just in case. An old story, just the new tools.

After all, if a neighbor gets carted off to be "disappeared" and you're told it's for some crime, you shrug. If it's for beliefs - you'd get mad, which they'd just as soon avoid, since that would result in having to lock us all up (no sheep to run the place left).
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Old 05-10-2012, 09:02 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged :
... There's no way to rule innocent men. The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws. Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What's there in that for anyone? But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced nor objectively interpreted -- and you create a nation of law-breakers -- and then you cash in on guilt. Now that's the system...that's the game, and once you understand it, you'll be easier to deal with. ...
boom
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:50 AM   #19
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* ~6 year old bump *

From the OP's link:
Quote :
...
In India, a massive effort is underway to collect biometric identity information for each of the country’s 1.2 billion people. The incredible plan, dubbed the “mother of all e-governance projects” by the Economic Times,has stirred controversy in India and beyond, raising serious concerns about the privacy and security of individuals’ personal data.

The plan is moving ahead at a clip under the auspices of the National Population Register (NPR) and the Unique ID (UID) programs, separately governed initiatives that have an agreement to integrate the data they collect to build the world’s largest biometric database. Upon enrollment, individuals are issued 12-digit unique ID numbers on chip-based identity cards. For residents who lack the necessary paperwork to obtain certain kinds of employment or government services, there’s strong incentive to get a unique ID. While the UID program is voluntary, enrollment in the NPR program is mandatory for all citizens.
...
India has rolled out their biometric ID system:
Quote :
Seeking to build an identification system of unprecedented scope, India is scanning the fingerprints, eyes and faces of its 1.3 billion residents and connecting the data to everything from welfare benefits to mobile phones.

Civil libertarians are horrified, viewing the program, called Aadhaar, as Orwell’s Big Brother brought to life. To the government, it’s more like “big brother,” a term of endearment used by many Indians to address a stranger when asking for help.

For other countries, the technology could provide a model for how to track their residents. And for India’s top court, the ID system presents unique legal issues that will define what the constitutional right to privacy means in the digital age.
...
More: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/07/t...d-aadhaar.html

USA has been attempting something like this for a while with REAL ID, et. al.:

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-..._b_542821.html

Latest (current) attempt is buried in a huge bill by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (HR 4760):

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/nat...60-biometrics/

Also, it's interesting to read back through this thread in light of the ubiquitous adoption of productes/services from corporations that are essentially collecting data for the NSA (FaceBook, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, etc.).
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Old 04-11-2018, 05:46 AM   #20
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: off world
Posts: 1,908
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Yeah good bump Bug
I miss those guys who contributed to this but are no longer posting here )-:



Its a fascinating dilemma.

I substantially reduced my internet profile around 6 years ago but all it probably achieved was to make it harder for the average joe to get a fix on me.
If I was to take the next step and avoid all electronic devices with communication potential, ie totally off grid, it would be really hard.
Even if I was part of an off grid community I would imagine there would be those within the group that continued to stay in touch with others and how would you track down an obscure part needed to fix the solar system ........

I think its already too late to drop off the system and now am pondering how I might live in the matrix as it is at any given time.
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