Privacy4cars.com - delete information your cars collect about you

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Saw this mentioned on my local news tonight:

 
I'm still investigating it, but it appears to be most useful in scrubbing info from any rental car your might use and any car you own that you plan to sell. There are different levels of risk depending upon whether you are connecting a cell phone to the car via bluetooth or not.
 
Hey bug: What good is this if the deletion of car info is traceable back to you. Not really sure how this is helpful for the average user or not,

Interested to know.

In a rental car would there be any come back on the renter who deletes information,
 
According to privacy4cars, all this personal data could be left in your car:

Phonebook, Passwords, Call Logs, ID’s & Biometrics, Text Messages, Medical & Financial Info, Navigation History, User’s Profiles, Home Address, 3rd Party Apps, Garage Door Codes, Vehicle Credentials

Some are obviously tied to having connected a smartphone. Some are related to having an OEM navigation system. Some are related to the use of infotainment systems. This information is stored in the computers in the car itself. When 3rd parties have access to the car - whether you sell your personal vehicle, lose the vehicle if it gets totaled in an accident or were using a rental car which you have returned - they could potentially mine that data from the car.

More details here:


From what I can discern, the privacy4cars app/system maintains a record that the car's data was wiped/cleaned, but does not retain a copy of the actual data that was deleted.
 
Gee. Aren't we all glad we got smartphones? And that we could sync them to our rental cars?

What a SURPRISE!...NOT!
 
Cars today collect a lot more data than they used to, often leaving drivers' privacy unprotected. Car insurance is mainly regulated at the state level—there’s no federal privacy law for car data—but unsurprisingly there is an active government and private market for vehicle data, including location data, which is difficult if not impossible to deidentify. Advertisers, investment companies, and insurance companies are among those who want to actively collect or use this data to deliver and enhance their products.

While we can’t anticipate all the issues that will emerge, vehicle data should not be used in ways that people do not understand or know about. And even when consumers agree to share their vehicle data, such as in exchange for better prices, we need proper guardrails in place to ensure data may only be used for purposes and by entities that people have agreed to.

Two components of mobility data have the highest value in the marketplace. The first is location data, which is incredibly sensitive. Where we go can easily point to who we are. A widely cited 2013 study from Nature found that four spatio-temporal points from an “anonymous” dataset can reidentify 95 percent of people. Just two could uniquely recognize 50 percent of people. Currently, much of that data is gathered from smartphones, but vehicle data is another common source.

The second is data used to derive risk, often referred to as telematics data. Some telematics data is intuitively familiar—how hard you brake, how sharp you take turns, whether your behavior indicates you're looking at your phone while you're driving. But we don’t know what, of all of the kinds of personal data that cars already collect—including, for example footage from in-vehicle cameras—companies might find useful for risk assessment. Today, all the top ten insurance companies have opt-in, voluntary programs that allow consumers to contribute their own telematics data used primarily for pricing auto insurance. Insurance companies should only collect what they need to get a clear, fair assessment of driving risk. To do so, they may not need to collect information such as location data—which, as we have outlined, raises serious and possibly insoluble privacy concerns.
...
Given the sensitivity of this data and what it can reveal about individuals, companies should clearly spell out which data they collect and how that data is directly relevant to determining a driver’s safety.

Any consideration of telematics data must be accompanied by strong, strict data collection, use, and privacy principles to ensure consumer protection, safety, and equity. The telematics industry should reject the approach of so many other companies —collecting broad amounts of data and trying to justify that collection later. Instead, companies should only hold on to this data for as short a time as is practicable, to avoid data breach or other unanticipated sharing. They should also ensure that information collected to protect driver safety does not end up being sold, shared, or accessed by others who wish to use it for other purposes. And any telematics scheme must be introduced on an opt-in only basis that does not penalize those who wish to protect their privacy and must have strong consumer protections in place.

We call on regulators and insurance companies to consider the following principles at a minimum.

- Data Minimization and Informed Consent. Insurance companies may not collect, process, or use any data before a policyholder accepts the terms and conditions of a telematics program directly from an insurer. Insurance companies also cannot do these things after a policyholder revokes their consent.

- Transparency about Data Use. To use telematics data, insurers must tell their customers, either before or at the time they enroll in a telematics program, that the insurer will abide by data use and collection rules. These should include an explanation of how companies capture data; a full description of what data companies collect and use; what data will be used to determine rates; and how people can request access to their information. People must also be told how to dispute any information they think is inaccurate. Companies should also explain which outside parties can access data and when, and give people clear instructions on how to inquire about a program, how to file complaints about it, and how to end their participation.

- Purpose Limitation and Opt-in Consent. A company that operates a telematics program must obtain consent from a consumer before sharing, selling, or disclosing their data. They must also get consent if they want to use a person's information for marketing or for any other purpose.

- Notice and Transparency about Data Sharing. Insurers that use telematics must give policyholders notice when they share information. This notice must include the name of the company that received the information.

- Non-Discrimination. All insurers that offer a telematics rating program must also offer an option to be rated without telematics.

- Location Data Retention and Use. If insurers collect precise geo-locational data, they can only retain it and any information from which precise location may be derived for 18 months after a policy expires, unless required for a claim, litigation hold, or for compliance with a Department of Insurance audit.

We propose these principles because, without appropriate limits and privacy practices regarding the collection and use of personal data, even innovative uses of data can pose enormous harm to consumers and perpetuate structural discrimination and inequity.

People should know what information is being collected about them and have meaningful choices about how and whether that information is shared. Insurers should recognize this; not only because it is right but also because it creates trust with their customers. Privacy is as important behind the wheel as it is for the phone in your pocket—and regulators should give drivers control over how companies collect and use this data.

 
Something has come to mind about this topic. I don't remember where I read this but I recall reading about a civil case where this infor was supeoned for a court case where the car owner had this information used against him. As I recall he lost.

So now your car could be testifing against you. Something new to keep in mind and your driving habit.
 
Here's a bump.

If You’ve Got a New Car, It’s a Data Privacy Nightmare​


Bad news: your car is a spy. If your vehicle was made in the last few years, you’re probably driving around in a data-harvesting machine that may collect personal information as sensitive as your race, weight, and sexual activity. Volkswagen’s cars reportedly know if you’re fastening your seatbelt and how hard you hit the brakes.


That’s according to new findings from Mozilla’s *Privacy Not Included project. The nonprofit found that every major car brand fails to adhere to the most basic privacy and security standards in new internet-connected models, and all 25 of the brands Mozilla examined flunked the organization’s test. Mozilla found brands including BMW, Ford, Toyota, Tesla, and Subaru collect data about drivers including race, facial expressions, weight, health information, and where you drive. Some of the cars tested collected data you wouldn’t expect your car to know about, including details about sexual activity, race, and immigration status, according to Mozilla.

Read the rest here:

 
Brought a new Subaru in July. Very high tech. Has an SOS button for emergencies. You don't have to make a call, speak - just push the button and it's like calling 911 for an accident. Knows your location. Has another button for roadside assistance. For me..........neat features. But not something you'd want if you were trying to avoid certain situations with authority types. With all of the technology in the car, god only knows what kind of info it collects and holds.

As for the o/p............Privacy4Cars has been around for a good while. Used by some fleets to get rid of info before they get rid of their inventory.
 
Having wiped out my truck (head-on-collision; Vaccident) I bought something new.

New to me.

If model-year 2000 is new.'

Electronic NUFFIN. Manual gearbox. Manual-crank windows.

It was (another) old geezer's truck, and his estate sold it off. Based on what it looks like, with low mileage, surface rust...it may be part of MY estate.

If I don't have another head-on Vaccident.
 

Court rules automakers can record and intercept owner text messages​

A federal judge on Tuesday refused to bring back a class action lawsuit alleging four auto manufacturers had violated Washington state’s privacy laws by using vehicles’ on-board infotainment systems to record and intercept customers’ private text messages and mobile phone call logs.

The Seattle-based appellate judge ruled that the practice does not meet the threshold for an illegal privacy violation under state law, handing a big win to automakers Honda, Toyota, Volkswagen and General Motors, which are defendants in five related class action suits focused on the issue. One of those cases, against Ford, had been dismissed on appeal previously.

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Having wiped out my truck (head-on-collision; Vaccident) I bought something new.

New to me.

If model-year 2000 is new.'

Electronic NUFFIN. Manual gearbox. Manual-crank windows.

It was (another) old geezer's truck, and his estate sold it off. Based on what it looks like, with low mileage, surface rust...it may be part of MY estate.

If I don't have another head-on Vaccident.


Those lemmings who agreed to be guinea pigs for the experimental injections are nothing but walking time bombs waiting to go off and possibly injure innocent people if they are behind the wheel when they stroke out. Already been some close calls involving airline pilots. Only a matter of time.

Don't get me wrong. I believe people should be allowed to inject anything they want into their bodies, but they need to be mindful of the consequences and not be a danger to those who chose to be a part of the control group.

vax89.jpg
 

Court rules automakers can record and intercept owner text messages​

A federal judge on Tuesday refused to bring back a class action lawsuit alleging four auto manufacturers had violated Washington state’s privacy laws by using vehicles’ on-board infotainment systems to record and intercept customers’ private text messages and mobile phone call logs.

The Seattle-based appellate judge ruled that the practice does not meet the threshold for an illegal privacy violation under state law, handing a big win to automakers Honda, Toyota, Volkswagen and General Motors, which are defendants in five related class action suits focused on the issue. One of those cases, against Ford, had been dismissed on appeal previously.

More:


Your Car is Spying on You - LEGALLY​

Nov 10, 2023


9:02
 
Mozilla recently reported that of the car brands it reviewed, all 25 failed its privacy tests. While all, in Mozilla's estimation, overreached in their policies around data collection and use, some even included caveats about obtaining highly invasive types of information, like your sexual history and genetic information. As it turns out, this isn’t just hypothetical: The technology in today’s cars has the ability to collect these kinds of personal information, and the fine print of user agreements describes how manufacturers get you to consent every time you put the keys in the ignition.

 
I've wondered how hard it would be to get a company together to buy (25-plus years old) Mexican-market cars, to bring into the States. A variety - Mexican domestic-market Jeeps of the VAM years - VAM being a state-owned company that built AMCs and Jeeps under license, including a six-cylinder engine, based on the Jeep six but tougher for Third-World conditions. Then some Japanese base-market cars (no airbags, no smog crap; some Nissans MADE in Mexico) and VW Type 1 Beetles.

I'd always wanted to get a newer VW Beetle with fuel injection...although getting a cheap, rust-free CJ-7 would be a great thing, too. Either, or both...and neither connected to the Internet of Everything.

Make a business out of mail-order sales to states that will readily title them, and maybe others with a warning of difficulties. Send the money, and a driver will deliver it to the location of your choice. Buyers' anxieties could be answered with a video of the car on a drive, including underhood and undercarriage videos.
 
So now your car could be testifing against you. Something new to keep in mind and your driving habit.

Law Will Install Kill Switches In All New Cars​

Story by Steven Symes

Once again, drivers get screwed by politicians in DC…​

Back in 1998, sci-fi TV series The X-Files aired an episode called “Kill Switch” about an AI gone rogue. Told when the internet was still accessed by most using dial-up modems, it was a fascinating tale of technology run amuck, a message about not handing too much of your life over to the digital world. While it might also seem like a sci-fi tale, soon enough the United States federal government could force automakers to install kill switches authorities can access and use to shut down any newer vehicle.

 
U.S. Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts has sent a much-needed letter to car manufacturers asking them to clarify a surprisingly hard question to answer: what data cars collect? Who has the ability to access that data? ...

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*This one's a bit different. I think there is a thread on it but I can't find it.

GM CEO says a key new safety feature will come to its cars​

In a December 13 interview by the Economic Club of Washington D.C., GM CEO Mary Barra said that the technology enabling passive alcohol-detection systems are coming to its cars.

"We've been working with regulators on that," Barra said. "We have technology to do that. [...] I think that's technology that's coming that I think is going to be good for everyone."

The response by the figurehead came a day after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration took its first regulatory step toward mandating technology that would detect and prevent the operation of light-duty cars and trucks by impaired drivers.

More:

 
I wonder what it's going to take to stop all this.

And if it can be stopped short of a total collapse of industrialized society. Do we have to go back to 800 years of riding mules to market, to get beyond this Kafkaesque insanity of being owned by machines?
 

Your Car Is Tracking You. Abusive Partners May Be, Too.​

After almost 10 years of marriage, Christine Dowdall wanted out. Her husband was no longer the charming man she had fallen in love with. He had become narcissistic, abusive and unfaithful, she said. After one of their fights turned violent in September 2022, Ms. Dowdall, a real estate agent, fled their home in Covington, La., driving her Mercedes-Benz C300 sedan to her daughter’s house near Shreveport, five hours away. She filed a domestic abuse report with the police two days later.

Her husband, a Drug Enforcement Administration agent, didn’t want to let her go. He called her repeatedly, she said, first pleading with her to return, and then threatening her. She stopped responding to him, she said, even though he texted and called her hundreds of times.

Ms. Dowdall, 59, started occasionally seeing a strange new message on the display in her Mercedes, about a location-based service called “mbrace.” The second time it happened, she took a photograph and searched for the name online.

“I realized, oh my God, that’s him tracking me,” Ms. Dowdall said.

More:

 
KpH, not mph.

Here's the tell: Speedometer needle is at 200

(a reading you never saw in American cars, even in the fantasy 1960s...the Corvette Stingray speedo only went up to 160)

and your tach is only at 4k. NO street car is geared that high. What many people don't realize is, with extreme performance engines, what limits speed is not power, but gearing.

It would cost much more money to put higher gears in a transmission coupled to an 800hp Hemi...and they'd basically be useless. Where can you travel 90-150 mph? I don't mean, legally. Where CAN you do it, without risking your life, and in the blink of an eye?

About three times, when I was younger, I had a motorcycle up above 100 mph. Frankly, it's a frightening feeling...especially on a public highway. Things happen FAST at that speed. Add to it, one of those times I was distracted (a tornado chasing me)...perfect recipe for a messy quick death.

Sorry to get off-topic. I share your sentiments...while you're reveling in a fast, electronically "dumb" car, I'm in my even-dumber slow little truck. And I like it.

It's good to be old. That 2000 truck, and me...we should run out of miles just about at the same time. I won't have to worry about what kind of golf cart Davos Man will let me lease.
 
KpH, not mph.

Here's the tell: Speedometer needle is at 200

(a reading you never saw in American cars, even in the fantasy 1960s...the Corvette Stingray speedo only went up to 160)

and your tach is only at 4k. NO street car is geared that high. What many people don't realize is, with extreme performance engines, what limits speed is not power, but gearing.

It would cost much more money to put higher gears in a transmission coupled to an 800hp Hemi...and they'd basically be useless. Where can you travel 90-150 mph? I don't mean, legally. Where CAN you do it, without risking your life, and in the blink of an eye?

About three times, when I was younger, I had a motorcycle up above 100 mph. Frankly, it's a frightening feeling...especially on a public highway. Things happen FAST at that speed. Add to it, one of those times I was distracted (a tornado chasing me)...perfect recipe for a messy quick death.

Sorry to get off-topic. I share your sentiments...while you're reveling in a fast, electronically "dumb" car, I'm in my even-dumber slow little truck. And I like it.

It's good to be old. That 2000 truck, and me...we should run out of miles just about at the same time. I won't have to worry about what kind of golf cart Davos Man will let me lease.

Every Corvette after 1997 has a 200 mph speedometer. It's silk screened onto the plastic bevel and does not change. My car has a magazine-rated top speed of 180 due to it being a ragtop. Never had it that fast though, due to a lack of straightaways long enough. All my speed runs are on I-66 between the Haymarket exit and The Plains (northern Virginia).

Fastest I've been on a bike was between 135 and 140. Didn't feel that bad. I was in a group of squids and we were on 66.

Every Corvette made after 2006 or so is capable of 200 mph as far as I know. Probably has to be a hardtop and you might have to fold the mirrors in, but they'll get there.

 
More data with a rear tire of 295-35/18 and 3:42 gears.

1 2.97:1 55
2 2.07:1 79
3 1.43:1 115
4 1:1 163
5 0.84:1 194
6 0.56:1 290 Purely theoretical as the car doesn't have the power to pull that in 6th. 6th gear actually loses you mph.





Edited to add:

Stock C7.
At this point, the C7 Corvette ZR1 needs no introduction, as it still reigns supreme as perhaps the ultimate iteration of the iconic model thus far – not just the prior generation. While a C8 ZR1 is in the works, the C7 model is still an impressive performance machine in every conceivable way, whether that be acceleration, cornering ability, and even its lofty maximum speed capabilities. Recently, one owner put that on clear display during a top speed run at the Johnny Bohmer Proving Grounds at Space Florida’s Launch and Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, and the results are truly impressive.

The C7 Corvette ZR1 – still the most powerful factory-built Corvette ever – utilizes the supercharged 6.2-liter LT5 V8 to churn out 755 horsepower and 715 pound-feet of torque, which makes it capable of rocketing from 0-60 mph in under three seconds, ripping off a 10-second quarter-mile pass, and reaching a top speed of more than 200 mph. GM managed to hit 212 mph in its own testing behind the wheel, and this example nearly matched that during this particular outing.
 
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Every Corvette after 1997 has a 200 mph speedometer. It's silk screened onto the plastic bevel and does not change. My car has a magazine-rated top speed of 180 due to it being a ragtop. Never had it that fast though, due to a lack of straightaways long enough. All my speed runs are on I-66 between the Haymarket exit and The Plains (northern Virginia).

Fastest I've been on a bike was between 135 and 140. Didn't feel that bad. I was in a group of squids and we were on 66.

Every Corvette made after 2006 or so is capable of 200 mph as far as I know. Probably has to be a hardtop and you might have to fold the mirrors in, but they'll get there.


1992 Corvette, about the fastest I could go was 167.
 
How about a TJ with a 5.3L Vortech engine?

View attachment 11567
Had a TJ.

For a modern translation of the old warhorse Willys/AM General M38A1, it was a good car. Perfect for college coeds who wanted to advertise grrl power as they did their mall-crawling.

Also good for upgrades for serious off-roading. Chrysler really did it right...but to my Philistine tastes, they lost the essence.

I had one. With the AMC 2.5 four, which made it economical and also a great road car, not nose-heavy. It was literally a mid-engine chassis, with the four entirely behind the front axle.

But with its obligatory power steering, power brakes, airbags, huge, intrusive dash with knee bolster...electronic car instrument cluster...short-throw five-speed that could have come out of any modern car...it wasn't, to my mind, a Jeep.

To me, a jeep has a painted metal floor; a long-throw truck four-speed; power nothing. And, that circular instrument cluster that dated back to AT LEAST 1955.

What can I say...I'm a Luddite; I'll own it.
 
Had a TJ.

For a modern translation of the old warhorse Willys/AM General M38A1, it was a good car. Perfect for college coeds who wanted to advertise grrl power as they did their mall-crawling.

Also good for upgrades for serious off-roading. Chrysler really did it right...but to my Philistine tastes, they lost the essence.

I had one. With the AMC 2.5 four, which made it economical and also a great road car, not nose-heavy. It was literally a mid-engine chassis, with the four entirely behind the front axle.

But with its obligatory power steering, power brakes, airbags, huge, intrusive dash with knee bolster...electronic car instrument cluster...short-throw five-speed that could have come out of any modern car...it wasn't, to my mind, a Jeep.

To me, a jeep has a painted metal floor; a long-throw truck four-speed; power nothing. And, that circular instrument cluster that dated back to AT LEAST 1955.

What can I say...I'm a Luddite; I'll own it.

When I was a kid, my Mom drove a Jeep like that, It rattled everywhere we went. I think it rattled when it was just sitting still.
 
When I was a kid, my Mom drove a Jeep like that, It rattled everywhere we went. I think it rattled when it was just sitting still.
If she had one with the Buick V6, it did. The old Odd-Fire engine. That engine's history alone is worth a multipage write-up. But in its first generation, it shook like a paint mixer.

My old man had a stripper 1968 Kaiser Wagoneer...before the model was redefined as a luxury SUV. Later, being broke, I owned at various times, two mail jeeps - a 1970 Kaiser DJ-5 and a 1973 AM General DJ-5c. Same vehicle; corporate reorganization, as AMC bought Kaiser and created a separate subsidy for government contracts.

Same vehicle, vastly-different engines - a Chevy II 4 and then an AMC 6, later to be refined as the Jeep Six, decades later.

But, yeah. Rattly floor, noisy - I glued old carpet remnants to the metal roof to quiet things - but I loved how I could park anywhere, how with nothing complex, little could break. I could fix it with a Kmart tool kit. And I always got to work. Sometimes wet, in snow or rain, but it happened. Started at twenty below.

I'm sure at my age I wouldn't enjoy it now, but I remember it as being fun, for a young man.
 
If she had one with the Buick V6, it did. The old Odd-Fire engine. That engine's history alone is worth a multipage write-up. But in its first generation, it shook like a paint mixer.

My old man had a stripper 1968 Kaiser Wagoneer...before the model was redefined as a luxury SUV. Later, being broke, I owned at various times, two mail jeeps - a 1970 Kaiser DJ-5 and a 1973 AM General DJ-5c. Same vehicle; corporate reorganization, as AMC bought Kaiser and created a separate subsidy for government contracts.

Same vehicle, vastly-different engines - a Chevy II 4 and then an AMC 6, later to be refined as the Jeep Six, decades later.

But, yeah. Rattly floor, noisy - I glued old carpet remnants to the metal roof to quiet things - but I loved how I could park anywhere, how with nothing complex, little could break. I could fix it with a Kmart tool kit. And I always got to work. Sometimes wet, in snow or rain, but it happened. Started at twenty below.

I'm sure at my age I wouldn't enjoy it now, but I remember it as being fun, for a young man.

Hers would have been a 60's vintage so I don't know what motor it would have had. She traded it for a 396 Chevelle SS and drove that until I was old enough to start driving. She got rid of it before I got my license. Probably good thinking on her part. :lmao:

Never owned a Jeep myself, but I drove a 1971 Road Runner to work and back for 13 years. 440 Wedge, purple cam, 4:10 gears, no carpet, no sound deadener, no back seat, no heat, no AC, no radio, and no power brakes (the motor didn't make enough vacuum at idle to support the power brake booster). The 8 point roll cage (welded in) went from the firewall to the back of the trunk. It would set off car alarms all down my block when I went to work in the mornings. :ROFLMAO: I loved that car, but my wife hated it with an unholy passion. 5 mpg on the highway.

Sold it for an '87 Buick Grand National. Dumped about $20k into a $17k car and eventually sold it when it became unstreetable. Lots of fun, but lots of broken parts. 22 pounds of boost on pump gas with alcohol injection. No part of the rear suspension was GM when I got done with it.

My mid-life crisis was getting rid of all my fast cars and getting an old man Corvette. It's stock except for the wheels, the entire exhaust, and some computer tuning.
 
.. According to a report published by the Mozilla Foundation on Wednesday, cars are “the official worst category of products for privacy” that it’s ever reviewed. The global nonprofit found that 92 percent of the reviewed automakers provide drivers with little (if any) control over their personal data, with 84 percent sharing user data with outside parties.
...
All 25 of the car brands that were researched for the report — including Ford, Toyota, Volkswagen, BMW, and Tesla — failed to meet the nonprofit organization’s minimum privacy standards and were found to collect more personal data from customers than necessary. The kind of information collected varies from personal information like medical data to how drivers are using the vehicle itself — such as how fast they drive, where they drive, and even the music they listen to. Both Nissan and Kia are noted to allow the collection of information regarding a user’s sex life. By contrast, Mozilla claims that 37 percent of mental health apps (which also have a poor reputation for data privacy) had better practices for collecting and using personal data.

Eighty-four percent of the reviewed car brands share personal user data with service providers, data brokers, and potentially sketchy businesses, according to the report, with 76 percent claiming the right to sell that personal data. Fifty-six percent are willing to share user information with the government and / or law enforcement if requested.
...

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What we want doesn't matter.

That should be obvious, after 55 years of hyper-regulating of automobiles.
 
What we want doesn't matter

My last p/u was a 1987 D150 (Dodge) with a slant 6 & a 1bbl carb. Had an AM/FM radio, A/C and roll up windows. Don't remember exactly what I paid, but it was less than 12K. It was wrecked in Jan '96. Best truck I ever had. Really wish they still made stuff like that. I'd buy one in a heartbeat.
 
Business Insider

Your car might be secretly recording every drive you take — and sending it to your insurance company​

  • Connected car services might be sharing your data with insurance companies.
  • Drivers told The New York Times about massive reports on their driving habits.
  • GM's OnStar Smart Driver program is a focus of the report.
Your driving habits aren't as private as you think they are, according to a recent report from The New York Times.

Internet-connected vehicles can gather data on driving habits, including hard braking and rapid accelerations, and share that information with data broker LexisNexis, which works with insurance companies to create personalized coverage.

One Chevrolet Bolt owner who spoke with The Times said he uncovered a 258-page report on his driving habits when he inquired about a 21% increase in his insurance costs.

Other owners in the story reported the same experience: Insurance costs skyrocketed, and when they inquired about what was going on, the insurance companies encouraged them to check their LexisNexis reports.

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