Climate Change Innovations, Legislation, Etc. (zero emissions, geoengineering, carbon tax, etc.)

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Farmers all over Europe (Germany, France, Poland, etc.) are revolting against Net Zero inspired environmental regulations. Some of the videos I've seen posted on X are pretty wild. Farmers are shutting down major highways with hundreds of tractors. They are spewing manure on government buildings. It's a massive revolt.
 
Farmers in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, Romania, and other countries across Europe are protesting radical leftist governments by obstructing major transport networks with tractors. This widespread populist movement is sweeping Europe at a time when over-regulation, taxes, and the climate change agenda threaten the livelihoods of not just farmers but working-class people and comes several months before the European election cycle kicks off in June.

Some countries hit hardest by protests have been Germany, Italy, Belgium, and France. Protests are expected to spread to Spain and Portugal.
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Farmers' anger spreads in Europe, governments promise help​

February 1, 20247:59 AM EST Updated 43 min ago

  • Farmers descend on Brussels as EU summit takes place
  • Greek farmers carrying coffin protest death of agriculture
  • Roads between Spain and Portugal blocked
  • Protests spread in Europe
BRUSSELS, Feb 1 (Reuters) - Farmers threw eggs and stones at the European Parliament in Brussels on Thursday, started fires near the building and set off fireworks as they demanded EU leaders do more to help them with taxes and rising costs.

With anger against green regulations and cheap imports shared among farmers across Europe, protesters from Italy, Spain and other European countries took part in the Brussels demonstration, which coincided with an EU summit nearby, as well as holding protests at home.

While local grievances also vary, the growing unrest, also seen in Portugal, Greece or Germany, exposes tensions over the EU's drive to tackle climate change.

"We want to stop these crazy laws that come every single day from the European Commission," Jose Maria Castilla, a farmer representing the Spanish farmers' union Asaja, said in Brussels.

The protests across Europe come as the far right, for whom farmers represent a growing constituency, is seen making gains in June's European Parliament elections. Leaders are trying to quell the anger.

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Greta beats the rap

UK judge dismisses Greta Thunberg protest case​

A London court threw out a public order case on Friday against climate activist Greta Thunberg and four other protesters, with the judge criticising "unlawful" conditions imposed by police when they were arrested.

District judge John Law dismissed the cases against the 21-year-old Swedish campaigner and the four other activists on the second day of their trial at Westminster Magistrates' Court.

He ruled that police deployed in the British capital in October at an environmental protest had attempted to impose "unlawful" conditions before officers arrested dozens of demonstrators.

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:lmao:

Greta Thunberg is a ruffian masquerading as a latter-day saint​

There’s no other way to say it: Greta Thunberg, the feted 21-year-old climate activist and two-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, is a ruffian.

As she laughed mockingly at Westminster magistrates’ court last week, charged with a public order offence for disrupting a conference of oil executives at the InterContinental hotel on Park Lane last year, she wiped her eyes with insane jubilation. No doubt she was recalling fondly her troupe’s smoke flares or their deafening din of drums, or their refusal to budge even a few feet at the pleading of the police so that delegates could actually leave the hotel. The boorish swagger of the girl is a wonder to behold – and her acquittal will make her all the cockier.

A few years ago, when she began her path to worldwide fame and adulation as a pearlescent-skinned teenager, her passion for righteous awareness-raising evoked, among the generous at least, a modern-day Joan of Arc.

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ICS Proposes $20-40 Carbon Levy With No Automatic Increases​

The International Chamber of Shipping has formulated a revised proposal for an IMO carbon emissions fund. As with earlier proposals, it would see two-way financial flows going in and out of one fund - carbon-emitting shipowners would pay money in, while low-carbon shipowners would take money out - but it incorporates new details.

Conceptually, the idea is a variation on ICS' previous call for a tax and subsidy system, which would raise the cost of conventional bunker fuel and lower the cost of expensive green fuel. This would have the effect of leveling the playing field and making green bunkering competitive on the global market. Zero-carbon fuels are expected to be about four times as expensive as conventional fossil bunker fuel, and most stakeholders predict that a tax and subsidy system will be required to achieve commercial scale.

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EU Commission set to scrap plan to halve pesticide use after farmer protests​

BRUSSELS, Feb 6 (Reuters) - European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen on Tuesday proposed withdrawing the EU's plan to halve the use of pesticides, calling it a "symbol of polarisation" as regional farmers protested over rising costs and other factors.

"Our farmers deserve to be listened to," Von der Leyen told the European Parliament.

"I know that they are worried about the future of agriculture and their future as farmers. But they also know that agriculture needs to move to a more sustainable model of production so that their farms remain profitable in the years to come."

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'Category 5' was considered the worst hurricane. There's something scarier, study says.​

As fearsome as Category 5 hurricanes can be for people living in harm's way, a new study reports global warming is supercharging some of the most intense cyclones with winds high enough to merit a hypothetical Category 6.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/category-5-considered-worst-hurricane-200106484.html

I swear, is there nothing that can't be attributed to global warming?
It's almost as if it has its own PR department and a late night pitchman telling you....
1707228584414.png
 
Cat # is largely meaningless. Some of the most devastating hurricanes had low category numbers. They just brought massive tide surges or moved very slow and dumped massive rains to cause severe flooding. Even low category hurricanes can spawn tornados that do most of the acute wind damage.
 
:lmao:

Greta Thunberg is a ruffian masquerading as a latter-day saint​

There’s no other way to say it: Greta Thunberg, the feted 21-year-old climate activist and two-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, is a ruffian.

As she laughed mockingly at Westminster magistrates’ court last week, charged with a public order offence for disrupting a conference of oil executives at the InterContinental hotel on Park Lane last year, she wiped her eyes with insane jubilation. No doubt she was recalling fondly her troupe’s smoke flares or their deafening din of drums, or their refusal to budge even a few feet at the pleading of the police so that delegates could actually leave the hotel. The boorish swagger of the girl is a wonder to behold – and her acquittal will make her all the cockier.

A few years ago, when she began her path to worldwide fame and adulation as a pearlescent-skinned teenager, her passion for righteous awareness-raising evoked, among the generous at least, a modern-day Joan of Arc.


Can we burn the obnoxious autistic snarling kid at the stake?
 

'Category 5' was considered the worst hurricane. There's something scarier, study says.​

As fearsome as Category 5 hurricanes can be for people living in harm's way, a new study reports global warming is supercharging some of the most intense cyclones with winds high enough to merit a hypothetical Category 6.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/category-5-considered-worst-hurricane-200106484.html

I swear, is there nothing that can't be attributed to global warming?
It's almost as if it has its own PR department and a late night pitchman telling you....
View attachment 11888


I missed a six foot putt for birdie last week. I blamed it on global warming and systemic racism.
 

Feature: Pipeline network crucial to Europe's bold 2030 hydrogen plans​

31,500-km network to connect supply, demand
Production focused on Northwest Europe, Iberia
Early clean hydrogen purchase tenders emerge

The planned European Hydrogen Backbone pipeline system is becoming increasingly critical to the success of the continent's nascent clean hydrogen economy, with major production project developers orienting plans around the network and offtakers opening tenders seeking pipeline deliveries.

The Hydrogen Backbone is expected to reach 31,500 km by 2030, with 40 concrete projects managed by the EHB's transmission system operator members set to be commissioned this decade.

TSOs are anticipating a demand boom.

"There is no risk in my view of overbuild," Co-chair of the European Hydrogen Backbone Maria Sicilia told S&P Global Commodity Insights. "It is rather the opposite. The risk is to not build enough infrastructure to meet our decarbonization goals."

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Shipping firms enter EU ETS at market trough; admin backlogs expected​

New EU rules will provide shipping companies with more opportunities to buy greenhouse gas emissions allowances at a market trough via opening a holding account, but market players worry that their application process could be prolonged by administrative backlogs.

As part of Brussels' regulation to extend the Emissions Trading System to cover shipping from this year, the European Commission on Jan. 31 allocated some 2,200 shipping companies each to an EU member state for registering a Maritime Operator Holding Account.

The announcement came as Europe's compliance carbon market is mired in near-term bearishness, with lower emissions forecast from power plants, soft gas prices and the EU's "front-loading" program to bring forward some allowance auction volumes to 2023-2026 from 2027-2030.

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JPMorgan, State Street Exit Climate Action Group, BlackRock Reduces Role

Quiver Quantitative - In a notable shift in the climate advocacy landscape, JPMorgan Chase (NYSE:JPM) and State Street (NYSE:STT) have exited the Climate Action 100+ (CA100+), a prominent global investor coalition focused on climate change. This move is accompanied by BlackRock (NYSE:BLK), which has relegated its CA100+ membership to its international arm, thereby limiting its participation. These changes represent a withdrawal of nearly $14 trillion in assets from collaborative efforts to address climate change on Wall Street.

The decision by these financial giants comes at a time when CA100+ has been intensifying its stance on corporate entities that are slow to reduce emissions. State Street Global Advisors, managing $4.1 trillion, expressed concerns that the new CA100+ priorities could compromise its independence. These priorities, adopted in June, are aimed at encouraging signatories to engage more actively with policymakers and disclose details on their progress towards achieving net-zero emissions by 2050. In contrast, JPMorgan's fund arm, with $3.1 trillion under management, attributed its departure to the development of its own investment stewardship capabilities, independent of the coalition.

 
Net zero is WEF concocted bullshit.
 

As Greenland Rapidly Sheds Ice, IMO Must Cut Shipping’s Black Carbon Emissions​

As a meeting of the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR 11) opens today in London, the Clean Arctic Alliance is calling on governments to protect the Arctic region by slashing black carbon emissions from shipping - writes the Clean Artic Alliamce.

During this week’s sessions, the IMO is expected to finalise guidelines for reducing the impact on the Arctic of black carbon emissions from international shipping, including recommended control policies and on black carbon emission data collection, monitoring and reporting. However, the Clean Arctic Alliance is calling for a commitment to develop mandatory regulations without any further delay. According to the Arctic Council, shipping in the Arctic is increasing, while black carbon emissions from shipping doubled between 2015 and 2021 [2,3].

Black Carbon


“After 13 years of IMO discussion, it’s high time the shipping industry took action to reduce the impact of black carbon emissions on the Arctic”, said Dr Sian Prior, Lead Advisor to the Clean Arctic Alliance. “The Arctic is recognised to be warming four times faster than the world as a whole, with tipping points likely to be reached. Scientists estimate that the Greenland ice sheet is losing 30 million tonnes of ice per hour and warn that the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is nearing a devastating tipping point due to the faster than expected melt-off from Greenland’s ice sheet” [4,5,6] .

“Amidst a global climate crisis, it is a travesty that there is still no regulation of black carbon emissions from ships, particularly as it has such a huge impact on polar melting, and given that the climate benefits of cutting this potent short-lived climate forcer are enormous”, said Prior.

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Vision for new affordable city in California meets skepticism from locals​

Cities worldwide are becoming overcrowded, overpriced and a source of global warming. That's why a group called "California Forever" is looking to build a livable, affordable, and eco-friendly community near San Francisco. But some local officials and residents are skeptical about the proposal. Paul Solman visited the area to find out if the developers' dreams could come true.


8:54
 

US SEC to vote on long-awaited climate disclosure rule, notice says​

Feb 28 (Reuters) - Wall Street's top regulator will vote on March 6 on whether to adopt rules requiring U.S.-listed companies to report climate-related risks, the agency said in a notice on Wednesday, in a potentially major overhaul of U.S. disclosure rules.

The Securities and Exchange Commission rules aim to standardize climate-related company disclosures about greenhouse gas emissions, risks and how much money they are spending on the transition to a low-carbon economy. The agency says that such information is important for investors.

Currently, US securities regulations do not impose common standards for climate-related disclosures. But the agency says that investors need such information to be consistent and comparable across the many companies increasingly producing climate information on their own terms.

First proposed two years ago, the rules are part of Democratic President Joe Biden's agenda to address climate change threats through federal agencies, and would join similar requirements in Europe and California.

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^^^^^^^^

The SEC votes this week on controversial climate change rule: Here’s what’s at stake​

Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler on Wednesday will hold a vote on one of his most controversial proposals: a rule that would require corporate America to disclose material risks posed by climate change.

President Joe Biden said climate risk is an “existential threat” and that it posed a greater risk than nuclear war.

The climate disclosure rule was first proposed in March 2022. When it was proposed, Gensler said, “Today, investors representing literally tens of trillions of dollars support climate-related disclosures because they recognize that climate risks can pose significant financial risks to companies, and investors need reliable information about climate risks to make informed investment decisions.”

“Today’s proposal would help issuers more efficiently and effectively disclose these risks and meet investor demand, as many issuers already seek to do,” he added.

The final proposal has not yet been released.

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