Water as emergency prep

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I live in the burbs with municipal water supply to the house. I installed a whole house water filter on the inlet to the house. I also have a separate reverse osmosis filter installed by the kitchen faucet. The filters on the kitchen system last a long time thanks to the whole house filter. I have to replace that one every year and that filter can be downright nasty when it's old. No idea if either filter catches the "forever chemicals" but trying to distill water for the whole family in large quantities isn't really practical.
 
Instead of 55 gallon drums, I bought some purpose built rain barrels years ago. They look nice and had built in faucet, hose attachment, bug screen, etc. It is nice to have the rain water stored up.
 
Went searching for a way to get my well water in the case of a prolonged power outage. I can handle short power outages as I have a Generac and a 500 pound propane tank for it, but I was thinking of a real SHTF scenario. My well is 300 feet deep with the pump sitting at 270 feet. However, there is so much water under my hill that my static water level is between 14 and 17 feet. I look at solar with batteries, but the startup amperage required by the well pump makes this problematic. After a good bit of research, I purchased one of these... https://www.apocalypsewellpumps.com/.


Hope to never have to use it, but feel better knowing that it is on a shelf in the basement if it is ever needed.
I made a 16-foot "wine thief" PVC pipe sealed at the end with holes near the top. It can be lowered to any depth by a good nylon rope. It fills through the top holes, and you haul up a 16' column of water. Even my wife can do it (we tested it).
 
I'm having a hard time imagining what you are describing @Unca Walt . If you get a chance, could you post a picture of it (or a web page that illustrates it)?
 
For example, let's say he used schedule 40 2" PVC pipe. The average inside diameter is 2.047". Which means that you would get a gallon of water from every 70.2" of pipe. Or roughly 2.7 gallons per "dip".
 
It's better water, if the well-driller and property owner found a good source.

I've had well water several periods in my life. Far less aftertaste - because, of course, nothing added. No stench of chlorine, as you sometimes find with city water. No added minerals to cake up faucet heads.

You are correct that it is better water. My well water has zero taste. People who visit comment on the quality of it. My sister lives in town about 20 minutes from me and she's on "city water". It tastes so bad, she has to buy gallons of spring water to drink. The government tests my well water twice a year for free and sends me a report on it. No issues at all so far.
 
My sister lives in town about 20 minutes from me and she's on "city water". It tastes so bad, she has to buy gallons of spring water to drink.
What, you won't let her just come down and fill up a few five-gallon jugs?

Spring water is EXPENSIVE.
 
If you lived on Long Island, you could tell when someone ran a bath. It smelled up the whole house. Down here in Floriduh, there are some municipalities that have city water. They are the ones that give out "boil water" orders from time to time.

Meanwhile, my well water has no accidental sewage discharge into it like Ft. Liquordale, but then I have a RO rig that gives me better than any bottled water.

Some people have wells from long ago; too shallow, or poorly maintained. That can get dicey. Nuffin's perfect, but experience has shown me well water -- in general -- is the better choice... if you can make a choice.
Funny story I read long ago, about a landlord with a well AND city water in Lake County, Ohio.

Now the whole of Northeast Ohio is over a huge salt dome. Normally it doesn't affect the well water - the aquifer and the water table are above it. Lake Erie somehow doesn't percolate down there - and there's salt mining near the shore, and - I'm not sure - maybe even under the edge of the lake. International Salt - the salt is mostly sold for road treatment in winter.

So. There's this guy renting a home, where there's a well that's salty. Also city water from the nearest village. And there's a country club nearby, also pulling village water. I mean, PULLING. They had an irrigation system, and since they were far enough from the water plant, they illegally installed pumps to SUCK water out of the system. All homes tapped into the water system in the area would have faucets hissing from the suction. When they were watering, all that the resident could do was switch to the well and wash, bathe and flush with salt water.

He was sick of it, as you could imagine. So the weekend before moving out, a hot summer weekend, he hooked up BOTH the well and the city water system and let the irrigation pumps suck out the briny well water, onto their nice manicured greens.

:cool:
 
What, you won't let her just come down and fill up a few five-gallon jugs?

Spring water is EXPENSIVE.


She's in her 70's. She doesn't drive that much and, when she does, she sticks close to town.
 
Funny story I read long ago, about a landlord with a well AND city water in Lake County, Ohio.

Now the whole of Northeast Ohio is over a huge salt dome. Normally it doesn't affect the well water - the aquifer and the water table are above it. Lake Erie somehow doesn't percolate down there - and there's salt mining near the shore, and - I'm not sure - maybe even under the edge of the lake. International Salt - the salt is mostly sold for road treatment in winter.

So. There's this guy renting a home, where there's a well that's salty. Also city water from the nearest village. And there's a country club nearby, also pulling village water. I mean, PULLING. They had an irrigation system, and since they were far enough from the water plant, they illegally installed pumps to SUCK water out of the system. All homes tapped into the water system in the area would have faucets hissing from the suction. When they were watering, all that the resident could do was switch to the well and wash, bathe and flush with salt water.

He was sick of it, as you could imagine. So the weekend before moving out, a hot summer weekend, he hooked up BOTH the well and the city water system and let the irrigation pumps suck out the briny well water, onto their nice manicured greens.

:cool:


I'm a golfer, so I recognize tragedy when I see it, but even I think that is funny. :lmao:
 
For example, let's say he used schedule 40 2" PVC pipe. The average inside diameter is 2.047". Which means that you would get a gallon of water from every 70.2" of pipe. Or roughly 2.7 gallons per "dip".
Dang, @CiscoKid -- Your numbers are so spot on it is scary.

I think @Unca Walt was describing a well bucket. Shit load of "how to" vids on them.


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's mine, but not as sexy as the way I did it. My rig has no moving parts, unlike those guys' rig. Just a 16' PVC pipe with holes near the top where the rope is tied.

The double benefit of my "wine thief" system is when the PVC pipe goes down the well... and the pipe sinks down (the bottom of the pipe is sealed) the water in the well reaches the holes at the top of the PVC, and it flows in and fills the pipe:

With right at two gallons of water or about enuf water that it weighs about as much as a sprinkler can. Easily handled by my dainty bride. Repeat as necessary.
 
Water only last so long. Get some of the filtering straws.
 
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