Cannabis Laws (incldg. Biden's Pardon)

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Either pot is removed from the culture, or we become - and remain - Idiocracy.
"Pot" has been a part of the culture for longer than either of us has been alive. The only dif now, is that in some States it is now visible. Whereas before it was mostly hidden, but still there just the same. Does having it hidden from view, really change anything? People were high in public for years and hardly anyone noticed until attention was drawn to it due to the legalization efforts.
 
"Pot" has been a part of the culture for longer than either of us has been alive.
No.

It was not part of Western culture. Yes, it was used, by fringe subcultures. And those who used it, were lower-class, and mostly stayed lower-class.

You can trot out "musicians." Well, I hate to say it...jazz musicians are not that far advanced from drum-circle noisemakers. Some make a living. Some are even pleasant to listen to. But before we could support jazz musicians, who dug the mellow all day and oriented around anonymous sex, pot and other gratifications...before we advanced to where there was wealth to pay for such parasites, we had to build steel mills, canals, mines and bridges.

Cultures where pot or ghanga were commonly used, were tribal bush societies, in tropical climates where there was little need to plan for survival. Like...say...Africa or the Caribbean islands.
 
Thanks for a reasonable reply, anyway.

You're right...we're not going to change each others' minds. I've been exposed to pot all my life, from junior-high, and have considered the pros and cons of legality.

You've got your own set of experiences. And you no doubt feel as strongly as do I.

But it's not MORALITY I'm concerned with. There's a lot of things I don't think are right, that nonetheless work, short-term or for one person's life. Like, say, polygamy. Or, encouraging your child to engage in adolescent sex, in the open. Or even supporting your child in teen parenting. None of which is savory, to my middle-class Puritanism; but it can work and has in other cultures.

This is different. This is impairment, which, IMHO - I'm taking facts as I see them and transposing them - will preclude the kind of society we had until just half a generation ago.

You need not agree or even try to rebut it. That's my expectation and prediction - and as it does, the truth will out, with time.

FWIW, I have experimented - just a few years ago, medically ruled off the railroad for my back and hips - experimented with pot as a pain-killer. I remembered it from my wasted youth as an unpleasant high - the befuddlement of other drugs but without the euphoria.

My memory was largely accurate. And it did nothing for my pain. Sorry...I've had past experience with codeine and even some opioids. Which I can attest, the latter are every bit as addictive as critics say; I was physiologically addicted in two days. But they offered a much-better way of dealing with pain than did pot and derivatives.



what option did they/who offer?
 
No.

It was not part of Western culture. Yes, it was used, by fringe subcultures. And those who used it, were lower-class, and mostly stayed lower-class.

You can trot out "musicians." Well, I hate to say it...jazz musicians are not that far advanced from drum-circle noisemakers. Some make a living. Some are even pleasant to listen to. But before we could support jazz musicians, who dug the mellow all day and oriented around anonymous sex, pot and other gratifications...before we advanced to where there was wealth to pay for such parasites, we had to build steel mills, canals, mines and bridges.

Cultures where pot or ghanga were commonly used, were tribal bush societies, in tropical climates where there was little need to plan for survival. Like...say...Africa or the Caribbean islands.
The point I was getting at is that the same people smoking the stuff now, were smoking it before it was legal. They just kept it secret. Now, it's out in the open where it can be seen by all. It was always there.
 
It always will be, now.

There's no putting the genii back in the bottle.

There IS, however, a way - in theory - to take the impaired off the roads, out of dangerous jobs, and out of the DemocRat Party and various protest riots.

We just lack the will to do that. So...we'll devolve. Europe started doing it in the early 1960s; it took us about 25 years longer for us to hit critical mass; but where they are, we're going; and we're both going to end up like Zimbabwe. Or like Kabul. Or like a blend.
 
what option did they/who offer?
None.

Take ibuprofen, or aspirin, or Tylenol; or take these prescription painkillers.

The opioids were after neck fusion surgery. The codeine was long ago, for an at-work injury. I was young and callow and found that #4 Codeine tablets went GREAT with about four beers.

I could have easily become an abuser, but lining up a supply, and paying for it, was just too much like work. So, I had my fun for a time.

I got NO similar pleasure off MM.
 

FBI Says Medical Marijuana Cultivators And Caregivers Can Own Guns, But Patients Cannot​

December 11, 2023 11:21 AM

My medicine or my gun?

This is a question medical marijuana patients who are also gun owners in the 38 legal MMJ states want answered.

What does the law say?

According to a 2019 FBI memo, that remained under the radar but was recently highlighted by the New York Times, medical marijuana (MMJ) growers and caregivers are permitted to own guns, but MMJ patients are not. It is still unclear if the memo has been updated over the last four years, wrote Marijuana Moment, which reached out to the agency, but did not receive a comment as yet.

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N.J. cannabis industry faces showdown between regulators and Big Weed. Top Dem is unhappy.​

New Jersey cannabis regulators last week once again fined a large cannabis operator and chastised others for alleged union violations, while legislative sources say the president of the state Senate has been unhappy with those moves by the Cannabis Regulatory Commission and may seek to change how it’s structured.

State Senate President Nick Scutari, D-Union, has mulled pushing a bill to revamp parts of the commission — including possibly making it part-time — during the state Legislature’s current lame-duck session, according to two legislative sources with direct knowledge of the situation who were granted anonymity to speak candidly about the issue.

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Bipartisan Effort Seeks Legal Cannabis For Veterans Through VA: Doctors Should Decide What's Best For Each Patient​

December 18, 2023

Bipartisan lawmakers sent a letter Friday to House appropriators urging them to maintain protections (contained in a spending bill) enabling physicians with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to recommend medical marijuana to veterans in states with legal cannabis programs, reported Marijuana Moment.

The letter, signed by Earl Blumenauer (D), Brian Mast (R), Dina Titus (D) and Lori Chavez-DeRemer (R), was addressed to honorable Kay Granger (R) and honorable Rosa DeLaurochair (D), chair and ranking member of House Committee on Appropriations, respectively.

“We write to urge you to maintain the protections included in both the House and Senate Fiscal Year (FY) 2024 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations bills to prevent the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) from prohibiting or penalizing physicians for recommending medical marijuana to any patient requesting its use in a state where such activities are legal,” the congressional lawmakers wrote.

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From the link:

Pennsylvania Governor Josh Shapiro (D) signed Senate Bill 773 last week allowing medical marijuana growers in the state to sell directly to patients. The news comes some six weeks after the Pennsylvania House Health Committee approved it and sent it to the full House.

Two days before the governor signed the measure, the bill was amended and gained final approval in the Senate. Amendments were included to allow cultivation licenses to independent dispensaries, reported Marijuana Moment.

 
This is going nowhere. Never enter an argument with someone who has an interest in one side...paid or emotional, end result is the same.

I'm putting a marker down on this: This societal insanity WILL NOT END, until pot use is ceased or minimized.

It, the compound and its use, came from Africa; and likely had a LARGE part in KEEPING Africa and Africans in a state where they neither independently invented the wheel nor even the most primitive of water transport.


Not so sure about that. I read a detailed account of an Englishman who was exploring Achin (now known as Aceh, an Indonesian province) in 1689. He accurately described the natives as using what was undoubtedly marijuana as a medicinal herb. Since these were not seafaring people at that time, I can only assume that the plant was growing there naturally.
 
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Cannabis is indigenous to Central or South Asia[190] and its uses for fabric and rope dates back to the Neolithic age in China and Japan.[191][192] It is unclear when cannabis first became known for its psychoactive properties. The oldest archeological evidence for the burning of cannabis was found in Romanian kurgans dated 3,500 BC, and scholars suggest that the drug was first used in ritual ceremonies by Proto-Indo-European tribes living in the Pontic-Caspian steppe during the Chalcolithic period, a custom they eventually spread throughout Western Eurasia during the Indo-European migrations.[193][194] Some research suggests that the ancient Indo-Iranian drug soma, mentioned in the Vedas, sometimes contained cannabis. This is based on the discovery of a basin containing cannabis in a shrine of the second millennium BC in Turkmenistan.[195]

Cannabis was known to the ancient Assyrians, who discovered its psychoactive properties through the Iranians.[196] Using it in some religious ceremonies, they called it qunubu (meaning "way to produce smoke"), a probable origin of the modern word "cannabis".[197] The Iranians also introduced cannabis to the Scythians, Thracians and Dacians, whose shamans (the kapnobatai – "those who walk on smoke/clouds") burned cannabis infructescences to induce trance.[198] The plant was used in China before 2800 BC, and found therapeutic use in India by 1000 BC, where it was used in food and drink, including bhang.[199][200]
Cannabis sativa from Vienna Dioscurides, c. 512 CE

Cannabis has an ancient history of ritual use and has been used by religions around the world. It has been used as a drug for both recreational and entheogenic purposes and in various traditional medicines for centuries.[201][202][163] The earliest evidence of cannabis smoking has been found in the 2,500-year-old tombs of Jirzankal Cemetery in the Pamir Mountains in Western China, where cannabis residue were found in burners with charred pebbles possibly used during funeral rituals.[203][204] Hemp seeds discovered by archaeologists at Pazyryk suggest early ceremonial practices like eating by the Scythians occurred during the 5th to 2nd century BC, confirming previous historical reports by Herodotus.[205] It was used by Muslims in various Sufi orders as early as the Mamluk period, for example by the Qalandars.[206] Smoking pipes uncovered in Ethiopia and carbon-dated to around c. AD 1320 were found to have traces of cannabis.[207]
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None.

Take ibuprofen, or aspirin, or Tylenol; or take these prescription painkillers.

The opioids were after neck fusion surgery. The codeine was long ago, for an at-work injury. I was young and callow and found that #4 Codeine tablets went GREAT with about four beers.

I could have easily become an abuser, but lining up a supply, and paying for it, was just too much like work. So, I had my fun for a time.

I got NO similar pleasure off MM.


CJ , the medical benefits of cannabis are empirical




 
That's not empirical.

That's testimonials.

Let me see a double-blind test, in controlled settings with neutral oversight.
 
That's not empirical.

That's testimonials.

Let me see a double-blind test, in controlled settings with neutral oversight.



even if I showed you proof , double blind and all that , , what are my odds that you will agree that cannabis is a legitimate medicine?

like I said before , the odds that I change your mind , at this stage of your life , are very very low , like less than 1%.

but here ya go anyway

do some research on your own..there are dozens of PubMed Abstracts on cannabis as a medicine

and yes , you are correct , it is those god awful side affects , like happy , hungry , and sleepy that will bring this society down


A Phase Ib, Double Blind, Randomized Study of Cannabis Oil for Pain in Parkinson's Disease​





Effects of Cannabis in Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis​



please educate yourself by reading a dozen or so of these Abstracts



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  • Analgesics

  • Cannabis*

  • Humans

  • Medical Marijuana* / therapeutic use

  • Parkinson Disease* / drug therapy

  • Quality of Life

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all the best

cracker



IMG_7530.jpeg
 
even if I showed you proof , double blind and all that , , what are my odds that you will agree that cannabis is a legitimate medicine?
Slim. Slim because there's no inhibition, anymore, about deceitful, skewed "tests." Everything from these Jabs to all the Weird Cures that pop-ups offer.

It's not at all like I don't have experience. My own and watching regular users - as a high-school student, as a welfare caseworker, other cases.

The side-effects include illogical thought, replacing logic with emotion (the hysteria I see on The View reminds me of potheads in difficult settings) and poor judgments. Like, quitting a job. Or borrowing money that can't easily be repaid, for expensive consumer crap.

Unca Walt can tell you - we went round over the years, from when we were on a current-events board, over Gold and abolition of the Federal Reserve. What he said didn't change my mind, and he said his piece and left it.

Except I didn't ignore it. I considered it. For months; for years.

So too, here. Except I had no experience with gold, back then, or Austrian Economics. Here, I DO have experience with pot and pot users. It will take a lot to change my mind.

And, hate to say it, but advocates' work is always suspect. For obvious reasons - a substance-abuser always believes his intoxicant of choice is "medicine." I've had alcoholics tell me that absinthe, the real stuff from Italy (which is actually toxic) was medicine. That, or other mixes. Or that beer is good for you.

Sorry. Life has taught me skepticism.
 
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is making thousands of people who were convicted of use and simple possession of marijuana on federal lands and in the District of Columbia eligible for pardons, the White House said Friday, in his latest round of executive clemencies meant to rectify racial disparities in the justice system.

 
It's SO easy to buy the votes of people whose whole world revolves around drug use....

That is part of why people who use drugs should be excluded from the voter rolls.

Only a pothead would think that the man who erased the borders and gave billions to the Taliban (and by sale, to China) in military hardware and $cash...and who is busily printing up money for 98 Flavors of Woke...only a narrow-focused, mind-altered low-performance type would think this dazed drooler with full diapers, is even worth CONSIDERING as a political leader.
 
Here's something you don't hear about too often.

Want to volunteer? These Delaware community events give you weed in exchange for help​

When it came time to present the pot, grant the ganja or bestow the bud ― however you want to say it ― the organizers of Delaware's first "Joints for Junk" decided to hand out the promised pre-rolls at the start of the two-hour trash clean up in Millsboro this fall.

While the Delaware Cannabis Advocacy Network has been organizing community events ever since its founding in 2013, this was the first time it was doing one since marijuana was legalized in Delaware eight months ago.

So the nonprofit advocacy group brainstormed a new way to attract volunteers: give out grass. And they didn't even wait until the volunteers put in the work first.

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LA Times

Editorial: Biden's marijuana pardons are welcome, but federal drug laws must catch up with reality​


President Biden on Friday demonstrated the proper use of presidential clemency power when he pardoned thousands of people who had been convicted of various nonviolent marijuana violations on federal land.

The reasons he cited included addressing racial disparities in drug prosecution and sentencing, and that's an important point. Criminal laws in theory cover all Americans equally, but in practice, laws punishing possession or use of small amounts of cannabis have been enforced over the years disproportionately against Black people. Unequal enforcement can render a colorblind law racist and an instrument of injustice. Clemency is a tool that, when wielded properly, can remediate flaws in the administration of criminal law.

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Last week, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by Houston lawyer Matthew Zorn, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) revealed the rationale for its August 2023 recommendation that the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) move marijuana from Schedule I to Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act. The document not only contradicts the position that the DEA has long taken on this issue; it contradicts the position that HHS itself took in 2016, when the DEA rejected a 2011 rescheduling petition. The reversal shows that marijuana's classification has always been a political question rather than a legal or scientific matter.
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political question my arse

more like Big Pharma flexing its gangster muscles

to much money in Tylenol
 

Gillibrand, Nadler call on AG Garland, DEA to scrap federal laws targeting weed​

US Senator Kirsten Gillibrand called on the Biden administration to ease up the federal prohibition on weed Sunday – arguing the current laws dating back to the 1970s have “torn apart” too many lives.

The New York Democrat, along with Rep. Jerry Nadler and several state lawmakers, urged Attorney General Merrick Garland and the Drug Enforcement Administration to deschedule cannabis on a national level, pointing out that the drug is right now in the same classification as heroin and is in a more dangerous category than fentanyl and cocaine.

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This article was published Oct. 4, 2023, and most recently updated Feb. 29, 2024.

As the list of U.S. senators co-sponsoring the SAFER Banking Act continues to grow ahead of a potential floor vote, Cannabis Business Times will continue to update this page regularly.

As of Feb. 28, 2024, there are 35 lawmakers signed on in support of the Secure and Fair Enforcement Regulation (SAFER) Banking Act (S. 2860), which was introduced Sept. 20, 2023, as revised legislation to the SAFE Banking Act. The new legislation, like its predecessor, intends to provide safe harbor for financial institutions wishing to serve state-licensed cannabis businesses.

The bill also prohibits a federal banking regulator from requesting or requiring a depository institution to terminate a deposit account unless (1) there is a valid reason, such as the regulator has cause to believe that the depository institution is engaging in an unsafe or unsound practice; and (2) “reputational risk” is not the dispositive factor.

Additionally, proceeds from a transaction involving activities of a state-sanctioned cannabis business would no longer be considered proceeds from unlawful activity under federal law. More details on the bill are here.

The SAFER Banking Act passed the Senate Banking Committee via a 14-9 vote Sept. 27 and was placed on the Senate legislative calendar under general orders as calendar No. 215 the following day. A pending floor vote is now in Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer’s hands.

To date, four Republicans, 29 Democrats and three Independents back the bill with sponsorship.

Below is the (fluid) list of the 36 senators who have signed their names to the legislation.
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Searched for a medical marijuana thread but couldn't find one.

How One Cannabis Blunt Changed This Man's Life: From Monthly Seizures And Depression To A Holistic Lifestyle​

  • At 15, Michael Kerwin, a marketing director for Native Sun Cannabis, was diagnosed complex partial left temporal lobe epilepsy.
  • With cannabis, Kerwin had successful results treating his seizures and was soon back playing sports.
  • Kerwin joined the industry to help others and spread the word about the benefits of cannabis.
"Nature is the source of all true knowledge." Leonardo da Vinci (1452 – 1519)

Did you know that some 50 million people around the world suffer from epilepsy?

Estimates say that up to 70% of people living with this neurological disease could live seizure-free if properly diagnosed and treated. For some people, an effective treatment can be found in nature.

One such person is Michael Kerwin, marketing director for Native Sun Cannabis, a family cannabis company vertically integrated in Massachusetts. Kerwin's professional acumen was fueled by his diagnosis and research. Benzinga wanted to learn more, so we reached out to Kerwin who was more than happy to share his story to help others.

At the age of 15, Kerwin was diagnosed with complex partial left temporal lobe epilepsy.

"I was experiencing monthly episodes of seizures where I was either still aware but unable to communicate cognitively or I was thoroughly unconscious with tightened muscles," he shared with Benzinga. "Amongst that adversity while being a student-athlete in high school, I was receiving adverse side effects of anger and depression via my anti-convulsant pharmaceuticals, Keppra, Depakote, & Lamictal. At this point, I was interested in any alternative."

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Seventeen years ago, the federal government raided Charlie Lynch's medical marijuana dispensary in Morro Bay, California, and charged him with five drug felonies. Lynch, whose business complied with state and local regulations, has been fighting to stay out of prison ever since, and last month he finally won that battle.

The Department of Justice (DOJ), which had been insisting since the first iPhone was released that Lynch should be incarcerated for at least five years, suddenly agreed to a deal that will spare him that punishment and erase his criminal record. The case, which proceeded on autopilot even as marijuana prohibition collapsed in one state after another, is a vivid reminder that the unjust, massively unpopular policy persists at the federal level thanks to presidential and congressional inertia.
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Not comparing the two...but if you want (on another thread) pot comes out the worse.

But they are comparable here. IMPAIRMENT.

Just as those who cannot think logically, cannot understand why strokes and heart failures are so common after Safe-And-Effective...so, too, can some people not see why overt acts of Public Stupidity are so common now that pot use has been mainstreamed.

And I daresay, Portugal's society is not so complex as ours, and their reporting agencies more-closely tied to censorious government.


Weed does not necessarily affect how one processes information. It might slow it down, but it's not going to change your core values if you have any.
 

SAF FILES BRIEF SUPPORTING MOTION FOR PI IN MEDICAL MARIJUANA 2A BAN​

BELLEVUE, Wash. — March 19, 2024 — Attorneys representing the Second Amendment Foundation and two individual plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit challenging the federal ban on gun ownership by medical marijuana users have filed a brief supporting their motion for a preliminary injunction in the case.

The brief was filed in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania. SAF is joined by Warren County, Pa., District Attorney Robert Greene, who has served in that office since 2013 and currently possesses a medical marijuana ID card under Pennsylvania law and James Irey, a veteran who was recommended medical marijuana but has refrained from obtaining a card as it would deny his ability to exercise his Second Amendment rights. They are represented by attorneys Adam Kraut, who serves as SAF’s executive director, and Joshua Prince of Bechtelsville, Pa. Defendants are Attorney General Merrick Garland, FBI Director Christopher Wray and ATF Director Steven Dettelbach, and the U.S. Government.

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SAF has a good track record in the courts. I'm definitely interested to see what happens with this case.
 
There is a wing of the GOP that does not understand the importance of individual liberty, They are happy to weild the weapon of government for their pet causes (usually some religious adjacent issue).
 
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