Cannabis Laws (incldg. Biden's Pardon)

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Same way it did prior to electronic banking.

Not so. Banks were regulated for 70-plus years; and prior to that, working under State laws. Moreover they were TRUSTWORTHY - because dishonest banks quickly folded as owners absconded, and usually wound up with prosecution.

That is the difference: Rule of Law and Equal Justice is now being erased.
There's always been danger.
Never were we a lawless kleptocracy. We used to marvel that Mexico and Central American republics couldn't get out of their chaos. Then, edu-indoctrinated young liberals decided to PRETEND that it was all about not having access to American money - and tried Nation-Building.

Didn't work, because without a cultural sense of morality, there can be no industrial society.

Now we're joining those lawless Failed States. Even to bringing in YUUGE numbers of their worst elements.

How did they do it prior to credit cards and wire transfers?
Cashiers had scheduled drops from their tills. Managers or Head Cashiers recorded the take, prepared deposits. One, two, or three a day, depending on how large the business and how busy.

Brinks or a similar armored courier would take receipts...their couriers clean, un-tatted, sober...having passed background checks (part of what the courier service OFFERED; employees who could be TRUSTED) and in their clean, pressed military uniforms, would take the cash receipts to the business's banks.

Smaller businesses would have the manager make the cash drop. That could lead to problems - I was a fast-food manager for a time, and an hotel night-shift desk clerk before that. The risk was, first, the manager getting mugged (happened to the hotel manager once) or the manager turning thief (common in fast-food operations, where management comes and goes). We used to send TWO people, sometimes THREE (the third person a shadow in a different car) to make the 11pm final bank deposit.

The gov has always had the ability to take from the citizens. Do you really think a bank is gonna say no to the gov taking your money from it? Even if it's an illegal seizure, they'll just turn over your funds and tell you to go fight 'em to get it back.
This has never happened in America before.

In nations where it has and it's commonplace...those nations have no large-scale businesses. They have street vendors.

We call them The Third World.

Imho, banks offer nothing but being a third party to hold money so it"s easier for the gov to take if it desires to do so.
Yes. And I'm pointing out that the logistics of holding cash without banks, are somewhere between inconvenient and impossible.

Besides, the only way a cbdc will ever be possible is by having the people hooked on not using cash. We should all be making the effort to use cash as much as possible while we still have it to use.
There's a big difference between "cash sales" and "Banks are Woke and seizing customers' money/refusing customers."

The myth of conveinance trumping all other concerns is gonna end up being the death of us all.
....and that'll have a much bigger cost than having a bill for a security guard.
It's not convenience.

It's the logistics of it.

Logistics. Meaning, here, is it PRACTICAL. In theory, we could easily get along in a barter economy...you bring your wheat to market, I bring my 20 hogs, and we trade without cash.

In practice, there's problems. That's why there's money.

In practice, there's problems with big piles of money, made at markets or various trade points. Big piles of money require large numbers of guards. Plus ways of keeping the guards straight.



Okay, we agree here, that CBDCs are not an answer; they're a trap and a tool of enslavement.

But the play is already set, by eroding trust in banks and in law.

You say, sure, we'll have a countinghouse under every Dillard's and Target.

I say, it's not practical.

I also say, that since it's getting to that, we're going to go the way that other regions, other societies went when no one could be trusted.

Beggars in the street; open bazaars for artisans to sell their clothing and wares, and everyone living at subsistence.
 
You seem to be arguing that we can't live without the banks handling all our money for us.

That's exactly what they need you to think.

Don't fall into their trap.

This has never happened in America before
Yes, it has and does. All the gov has to do is tell the bank that they gave themselves a piece of paper that says they get to seize your money, and the bank will turn it over to them with no questions asked.

It's been that way longer than anyone reading these words have been alive.


Yes. And I'm pointing out that the logistics of holding cash without banks, are somewhere between inconvenient and impossible.
Only because people have been conditioned to think that way.


There's a big difference between "cash sales" and "Banks are Woke and seizing customers' money/refusing customers."
If at the first instance of that happening, people had enough back bone to go close their accounts and demand cash on the spot, they'd stop doing that crap real quick.


It's not convenience.

It's the logistics of it
It is about convenience. Everything from cc's to electronic payment apps have convenience as their number one selling point.


Logistics. Meaning, here, is it PRACTICAL
Imho, cash is very practical.


Okay, we agree here, that CBDCs are not an answer; they're a trap and a tool of enslavement.
And the push for cashless and scare mongering about using cash only feeds into the push towards a cbdc.

Why give the traitorous f's what they want?
 
Pretending it is practical...workable...is not the same as demonstrating that it IS.

Meaning no disrespect, but how much do you know of the settling of the American West? Not the overview; the details.

Train robberies. And how we don't have them anymore.

Because we don't have cash payrolls anymore...which means no need to ship boxcars full of $20 gold pieces across vast open spaces, anymore.

Train and bank robberies could wipe out businesses...when a frontier bank was robbed on payday or when it otherwise would be expecting a large money movement, it could bankrupt the mine, the express company, the local railroad.

Yes, banks were not immune. But banks, trustworthy men/organizations whose JOB was to safeguard large cash...these were a bulwark.

Imagine how chaotic it was for the Central Pacific and Union Pacific, at the railhead, on payday. You needn't imagine it - it's in recorded history.

Now, imagine how chaotic, how impossible, it would be, in today's age, where might-make-right; where morality means political agreement with the Ruling Elites, where there is no set standard of morality - and police and banking corporations both seek to smite those they disagree with.

I'm done here. I dislike PRETENDING these problems don't exist, when it's both obvious and demonstrated that they do.

If we lose trustworthy banks, then the only way major corporations can work, is cashless. Which means, some sort of digital payment. Which, now that Davos Man is pushing digital chits...it means that only businesses that are subservient and actively working with Globalism, will be allowed to function.

You're not going to run Target, or Albertson's, or Yellow Freight Lines, or Ford Motor Company, on cash.

Asserting otherwise, is not persuasive evidence.
 
Like I said, you are trying to argue for cashlessness. We don't need it and no freedom loving person should want it.

Yes, there can be issues with using cash exclusively, but there are worse problems that would come with cashlessness.
....and having banks to facilitate all transactions due to security and convenience concerns would end up being worse for us than tany problems that using cash and maintaining privacy would bring.

Lets not play into the traitorous f's hands by helping them achieve their goals.
 
You're not going to run Target, or Albertson's, or Yellow Freight Lines,
Sure ya could. That's why there used to be Bills all the way up to $100k in circulation.
....and that was back when stuff was really cheap.

Based on inflation, we should have $million+ dollar bills in circulation now.

only having small denomination bills is what makes using all cash, impractical when dealing with millions of dollars.
 
Like I said, you are trying to argue for cashlessness. We don't need it and no freedom loving person should want it.

Yes, there can be issues with using cash exclusively, but there are worse problems that would come with cashlessness.
....and having banks to facilitate all transactions due to security and convenience concerns would end up being worse for us than tany problems that using cash and maintaining privacy would bring.

Lets not play into the traitorous f's hands by helping them achieve their goals.
Nope.

I'm arguing that cash-no-banks is impossible.

I don't want CBDCs, either. Not even Buttcorn.

I'd really like to see a PM-based monetary system.

But there IS GOING to have to be BANKS, and INFRASTRUCTURE to HANDLE the money.

CBDCs remove that...but they remove most of the satisfactions of living in a free society, too.
 
Ohio, where legislators authorized medical use of marijuana in 2016, went further on Tuesday, becoming the 24th state to legalize recreational use. According to projections by NBC News and The Hill, voters approved Issue 2, which allows adults 21 or older to publicly possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and grow up to six plants at home. With 57 percent of ballots counted, 56 percent of voters had said yes to the ballot initiative, which also will create a system to license and regulate commercial sales.

That's assuming Ohio legislators do not rewrite or override the rules established by Issue 2, which they have the power to do with any "initiated state statute," as opposed to a constitutional amendment. Before Issue 2 was submitted to voters, the Republican-controlled Ohio General Assembly passed up a chance to enact it, and now the measure returns to the legislature, which can revise it before it takes effect.
...
Legalization of possession takes effect in Ohio on December 7. State regulators are supposed to start issuing commercial licenses within nine months.
...
Once people can legally buy marijuana, where can they legally consume it? That question has presented a puzzle in other states that have legalized recreational use without allowing businesses analogous to bars or restaurants that serve alcohol. The problem is especially acute for out-of-state visitors, who are apt to find that their hotels frown upon marijuana use.

The Ohio initiative obliquely addresses that issue. It says marijuana use in "public areas" is a "minor misdemeanor," punishable by a $150 fine. It explicitly does not permit marijuana use on "federal, state, or locally owned land." It says landlords may not reject tenants based primarily on their cannabis consumption, although they would be allowed to prohibit pot smoking as long as that is a condition of the lease. Finally, the initiative says it does not "prohibit any public place from accommodating an individual's use of [recreational] cannabis," which seems to leave room for businesses where people can legally use marijuana.
...

 
In Canada, Marijuana was illegal until medical cannabis was legalized in 2001. By 2015 Justin Trudeau campaigned on legalizing cannabis as a controlled substance, similar to alcohol and tobacco.
Since the majority of Canadians supported "Decriminalizing", instead of "Legalizing" cannabis, this became THE talking point in the Liberal Campaign and resulted in a majority government being elected.

I can see the exact same playbook being used by Biden, running up to the 2024 election. It's entirely possible to get a shitty government elected on a single campaign issue, especially in a close race.
Legalize MJ and pardon those incarcerated for simple possession. Expunge their criminal records and you have an easy 10 million votes.
 
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —
Nearly 100,000 marijuana convictions have been expunged from government records as part of a constitutional amendment Missouri voters approved a year ago.

Under the new law, nearly every misdemeanor marijuana conviction was supposed to be expunged by June 8 with the exception for offenders still incarcerated or currently supervised by the Department of Corrections.

 
From the link:

A powerful GOP-controlled House committee has blocked another series of marijuana and psychedelic reform amendments to large-scale spending legislation, including a bipartisan proposal to protect all state cannabis programs from federal interference.

The House Rules Committee declined to make in order for floor consideration several marijuana amendments during meetings on Monday and Tuesday. While most of the measures called for modest reforms supported by legalization advocates, the panel also blocked a proposal from prohibitionist Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX) that would have prevented the Biden administration from rescheduling cannabis.

 
From the link:

A group of 20 Democrats led by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) are urging the Treasury Department to revise “out-of-date guidance” related to state-legal marijuana businesses and the Bank Secrecy Act, according to a letter obtained by Punchbowl News.

Democrats argue that guidelines published in 2014 during the Obama presidency predate “action by many states to legalize marijuana possession and sales” and must therefore be updated.

 
From the link:

A group of 20 Democrats led by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) are urging the Treasury Department to revise “out-of-date guidance” related to state-legal marijuana businesses and the Bank Secrecy Act, according to a letter obtained by Punchbowl News.

Democrats argue that guidelines published in 2014 during the Obama presidency predate “action by many states to legalize marijuana possession and sales” and must therefore be updated.



The squaw speaks. :ROFLMAO:
 

Maryland Republicans Want To Let Police Search Cars And People Based On Smell Of Marijuana, Which Is A Legal Product​


Republican lawmakers in Maryland are aiming to undo a law that prevents police from stopping or searching people and vehicles based merely on the smell of marijuana, claiming the measure has put motorists at risk and took away an important tool used by law enforcement to seize people’s firearms.

The effort is one of five legislative proposals that the Maryland General Assembly’s Joint Republican Caucus unveiled this week as part of its public safety agenda for the coming legislative session, which runs from January to April of next year.

 
Related

Battle for Freedom: Fighting Congress to Legalize Weed for Veterans​

Nov 22, 2023


8:56

New Interview featuring Bryan Buckley, a Marine Raider Veteran | CEO/Co-Founder @hvgcompany | Founder @battlebrothersfoundation | Chairman: San Diego Chamber of Commerce
 

GOP's Stunning Reversal: Ohio Senate Approves Immediate Marijuana Sales, Home Grow & Expungement​

ZINGER KEY POINTS​

  • With legal cannabis going into effect on Thursday, adults can begin buying cannabis from existing medical marijuana shops in 90 days.
  • Home cultivation is an important demand the GOP Senate approved after pressure from advocates who supported Issue 2.
In a surprise move Ohio's GOP-controlled Senate passed a revised bill significantly expanding the scope of the state's voter-approved cannabis initiative, known as Issue 2. The legislation put forward by the Senate, rather than gutting the initiative as advocates feared, will allow adults to start buying cannabis from existing medical marijuana dispensaries in as soon as 90 days. It also maintains the right to cultivate marijuana plants at home and includes a key provision for the automatic expungement of certain past cannabis-related convictions.

More:

 
Her hypocrisy is astounding. She's a warrior against debanking legal industry that she favors (marijuana), but she's all for debanking legal industry that she hates (crypto).


Show me a leftist that is not a complete and total hypocrite. It can't be done. Their views are so irrational and so distorted from reality that they cannot state them without falling into hypocrisy.
 
Some context on the Ohio Senate approving the marijuana bill:
...
Before the election, Ohio Senate President Matt Huffman (R–Lima) said that if voters approved Issue 2, he would "advocate for reviewing things or repealing things or changing things that are in it." Although Huffman was not specific, a bill that the Senate General Government Committee overwhelmingly approved on Monday would have reduced the possession limit to one ounce, eliminated permission for homegrown marijuana, reduced the statewide cap on the number of retailers from 350 to 230, increased the retail tax to 15 percent, and imposed a 15 percent tax on growers. It also would have effectively recriminalized marijuana possession by banning possession of cannabis obtained outside of a state-authorized distribution system that might not be up and running until late 2024 or early 2025.

After hearing testimony against that controversial proposal on Tuesday and getting an earful from outraged constituents, the committee dramatically changed course. On Wednesday, it unanimously approved a bill that would retain Issue 2's possession limit, preserve the home cultivation option, and allow medical marijuana dispensaries to begin serving the recreational market in the near future, perhaps within a few months. The bill, which passed the Senate by a 28–2 vote, also goes beyond Issue 2 by requiring expungement of criminal records involving low-level marijuana possession.

During "the last three or four days," committee chair Michael Rulli (R–Youngstown) said, "a lot of the public has reached out to probably every single one of our senators with thousands of emails and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of calls. I think the people have spoken." Republican Gov. Mike DeWine, who also opposed Issue 2, called the Senate-approved legislation "a very, very good bill," saying, "We have an obligation to follow the will of the people."
...


If a critical mass of voters raise their voices, the political class will listen. For all the faults in our system of government (or the way the two party system is currently structured), it's really nice to see examples of it working like this.
 
In a significant development, Rep. Dave Joyce (R-OH) has reintroduced the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) 2.0 Act, signaling a renewed effort to end federal marijuana prohibition in states where it is legal.

The revised bill, co-sponsored by Rep. Lori Chavez-DeRemer (R-OR), Brian Mast (R-FL), Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Troy Carter (D-LA), goes beyond decriminalizing state cannabis programs by proposing a federal tax-and-regulate framework for the cannabis industry, reported Marijuana Moment.

 
Here in FL and especially near the beach it is very common to smell weed vapes and joints everywhere including parks, intersections and fast food restaurants/convenience stores.
 
Here in FL and especially near the beach it is very common to smell weed vapes and joints everywhere including parks, intersections and fast food restaurants/convenience stores.



one way to make that situation dangerous is to add a few taco trucks
 
Here in FL and especially near the beach it is very common to smell weed vapes and joints everywhere including parks, intersections and fast food restaurants/convenience stores.
Part of the unfolding collapse.

During London's Gin Craze period - brought about by new inexpensive industrial distillation of gin - a period of complete social breakdown followed. Mothers selling their children to perverts, for a few pence to buy more gin. Adolescent boys drunken in gutters.

England didn't collapse, quickly, then - but it laid the course for their slow decline. They probably in fact had lost the right to claim themselves a Global Superpower, but it took another 50-70 years for that status to be tested and found not-so.

Since we're in medical and political chaos, including erasure of borders...it's going to happen a lot quicker. But huge numbers of impaired persons, won't help a thing. Crises require clear heads and fast wits, able to construct a plan of action.
 
Part of the unfolding collapse.

During London's Gin Craze period - brought about by new inexpensive industrial distillation of gin - a period of complete social breakdown followed. Mothers selling their children to perverts, for a few pence to buy more gin. Adolescent boys drunken in gutters.

England didn't collapse, quickly, then - but it laid the course for their slow decline. They probably in fact had lost the right to claim themselves a Global Superpower, but it took another 50-70 years for that status to be tested and found not-so.

Since we're in medical and political chaos, including erasure of borders...it's going to happen a lot quicker. But huge numbers of impaired persons, won't help a thing. Crises require clear heads and fast wits, able to construct a plan of action.


theynsaid that about Portugal when they decriminalized ALL drugs

the other EU countries said Portugal will become the cesspool of europe

hahahahahaa!…..please go read up on how Portugal is doing today , they are a roll model for many countries when it comes to managing the failed War on Drugs

and please CJ , the old alcohol vs marijuana argument has expired
 
theynsaid that about Portugal when they decriminalized ALL drugs

the other EU countries said Portugal will become the cesspool of europe

hahahahahaa!…..please go read up on how Portugal is doing today , they are a roll model for many countries when it comes to managing the failed War on Drugs

and please CJ , the old alcohol vs marijuana argument has expired
Not comparing the two...but if you want (on another thread) pot comes out the worse.

But they are comparable here. IMPAIRMENT.

Just as those who cannot think logically, cannot understand why strokes and heart failures are so common after Safe-And-Effective...so, too, can some people not see why overt acts of Public Stupidity are so common now that pot use has been mainstreamed.

And I daresay, Portugal's society is not so complex as ours, and their reporting agencies more-closely tied to censorious government.
 
Not comparing the two...but if you want (on another thread) pot comes out the worse.

But they are comparable here. IMPAIRMENT.

Just as those who cannot think logically, cannot understand why strokes and heart failures are so common after Safe-And-Effective...so, too, can some people not see why overt acts of Public Stupidity are so common now that pot use has been mainstreamed.

And I daresay, Portugal's society is not so complex as ours, and their reporting agencies more-closely tied to censorious government.


medicine brother , cannabis is medicine , not impairment

the side effects are horrible for sure……..happy , hungry , and sleepy

put 4 men together , add alcohol , guaranteed a fight will break out

put 4 men together , add pot , good chance a band will break out

have you ever smoked cannabis or ate a cannabis brownie?
 
This is going nowhere. Never enter an argument with someone who has an interest in one side...paid or emotional, end result is the same.

I'm putting a marker down on this: This societal insanity WILL NOT END, until pot use is ceased or minimized.

It, the compound and its use, came from Africa; and likely had a LARGE part in KEEPING Africa and Africans in a state where they neither independently invented the wheel nor even the most primitive of water transport.
 
CJ, are you arguing for the use of government force (for the benefit of society) over the liberty of the individual for self determination?
 
CJ, are you arguing for the use of government force (for the benefit of society) over the liberty of the individual for self determination?
No, I'm saying widespread pot use would lead, has led, us to where we are, now. Exactly.

I'm tired of the dishonest, circular arguments. There are two ways to deal with this: Ban the substance; or ban participation in society of those who use this substance. Ban, such as: No responsible work positions, e.g., operator, driver, decision-maker. No vote. No public subsidies, e.g., welfare (no, antiSocial inSecurity is not a public subsidy; for most people it's partial rebate of past taxes, so that would not apply here).

No driver's licenses for those who pop positive. That would end the green-light campers at intersections, as well as idiots who can't figure out the difference between 18 on that big dial and 45, on the big white sign.

Beyond that...if they want to sweep floors, pick up trash, sell their a$$3$ and use the proceeds to buy drugs, I'm okay with it.

Most people, obviously, are not. That leaves the other option, banning it. And the legalization argument is lost - I warned this ten years ago, there'd be no putting that genii back in the bottle.

So. We don't recover from our Mass Public Stupidity, until we put the bongs down.

I'm not dealing with what I want. I'm dealing with reality
 
I'm not arguing anything.

Like I said: I'm putting a marker down. My money says, that's how it's going to go.

Either pot is removed from the culture, or we become - and remain - Idiocracy.
 
fixed it for ya Amigo!..
No, you didn't.

Two different substances. Short-term impairment (one hour a drink) versus longer term, and with daily users, chronic.

Neurological depressant versus mild hallucinogenic.

A drunk has immediate tells, and is limited in what he can do. A pot user doesn't HAVE those tells - the stagger, the sleepiness - and thus it's harder to immediately spot, impairment from low IQ.

A chronic drunk solves the problems he creates - that is, he winds up in a hole in the ground. A chronic pot user can do it all his life, or at least much longer. Meaning MOAR impaired choices and actions, for decades.

Impaired like, voting for Leftists. Impaired like, imposing or at least loudly supporting, Woke insanity at work, or on others in whatever setting. Impaired in choices - on the road, with finances, with choices of friends and social contacts.

LIKE I SAID...this argument goes nowhere. There's no rational argument about an intoxicant with a person who's impaired or who likes getting impaired. I've made, not a prediction, but an expectation of a precursor: NONE of this insanity goes away until the chemical compound that makes people stupid, goes away.

Party on, dood.
 
my tells are the harsh side effects of marijuana , horrible withdrawal symptoms too

tells like happy , hungry , and sleepy

listen CJ , we probably have more in common than we disagree on and I know the odds of me changing your mind are slim to nothing

but please , won’t you just agree with me that there are medicinal benefits from using cannabis , as a medicine , smoking , vaping , topical salves , and edibles as delivery devices for the cannabinoids?…

it sure helps me is all I can tell you


5 fractures there CJ , C 3,4, and 5…..all held together with hardware…the pain was some of the worst I had ever experienced and I am in my 70’s , with the help of using cannabis , I never took 1 of the legally prescribed opiates the doctor recommended for pain management



IMG_1004.jpeg
 
my tells are the harsh side effects of marijuana , horrible withdrawal symptoms too

tells like happy , hungry , and sleepy

listen CJ , we probably have more in common than we disagree on and I know the odds of me changing your mind are slim to nothing

but please , won’t you just agree with me that there are medicinal benefits from using cannabis , as a medicine , smoking , vaping , topical salves , and edibles as delivery devices for the cannabinoids?…

it sure helps me is all I can tell you
Thanks for a reasonable reply, anyway.

You're right...we're not going to change each others' minds. I've been exposed to pot all my life, from junior-high, and have considered the pros and cons of legality.

You've got your own set of experiences. And you no doubt feel as strongly as do I.

But it's not MORALITY I'm concerned with. There's a lot of things I don't think are right, that nonetheless work, short-term or for one person's life. Like, say, polygamy. Or, encouraging your child to engage in adolescent sex, in the open. Or even supporting your child in teen parenting. None of which is savory, to my middle-class Puritanism; but it can work and has in other cultures.

This is different. This is impairment, which, IMHO - I'm taking facts as I see them and transposing them - will preclude the kind of society we had until just half a generation ago.

You need not agree or even try to rebut it. That's my expectation and prediction - and as it does, the truth will out, with time.

FWIW, I have experimented - just a few years ago, medically ruled off the railroad for my back and hips - experimented with pot as a pain-killer. I remembered it from my wasted youth as an unpleasant high - the befuddlement of other drugs but without the euphoria.

My memory was largely accurate. And it did nothing for my pain. Sorry...I've had past experience with codeine and even some opioids. Which I can attest, the latter are every bit as addictive as critics say; I was physiologically addicted in two days. But they offered a much-better way of dealing with pain than did pot and derivatives.
 
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