Privacy, encryption vs. Surveillance state

singleshot

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“On August 30, CIA satellites and supercomputers were taken down and likely seized by [U.S. President Donald] Trump’s new Space Force, and GCHQ [British Intelligence] was removed from the NSA database to also render cabal elements in the UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, France, Germany, and Israel deaf and blind,” Pentagon sources explained.

https://www.disclosurenews.it/en/good-rothschild-trump-financial-reset/
 

pmbug

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Uh... Don't know what to tell you singleshot... Fulford has been a prolific prophet of doom for years now - a louder and seemingly more radical claxon bell than Jim Willie. I am not in the habit of reading his stuff, but I do recall some time ago there was a thread about him...

https://www.pmbug.com/forum/f9/ben-fulford-april-17-a-800/

A lot of the stuff in the page you linked doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me.
 

11C1P

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I'm fairly certain if George Orwell were alive he'd be pointing to a lot of things & saying "see, I told you so!"
 

pmbug

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Related to the subject of the thread, but not necessarily the article in the OP:
John McAfee said:
The "Presidential alerts": they are capable of accessing the E911 chip in your phones - giving them full access to your location, microphone, camera and every function of your phone. This not a rant, this is from me, still one of the leading cybersecurity experts. Wake up people!
https://twitter.com/officialmcafee/status/1047585232831041536

The other day, cell phones all across the USA went off as part of a nationwide test of this alert system. The EFF says McAfee is wrong:
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McAfee’s tweet gets two key things wrong about this system: There is no such thing as an E911 chip, and the system does not give “them” the information he claims. In fact, the Presidential Alert does not have any way to send data about your phone back to the mobile carrier, though your phone is sending data to mobile carriers all the time for other reasons.
Privacy Issues with Enhanced 911

This isn’t to say that there aren’t serious privacy issues with the E911 system. The E911 system was developed by the FCC in the early 2000’s after concerns that the increased use of cellular telephones would make it harder for emergency responders to locate a person in crisis. With a landline, first responders could simply go to the billing location for the phone, but a mobile caller could be miles from their home, even in another state. The E911 standard requires that a mobile device be able to send its location, with a high degree of accuracy, to emergency responders in response to a 911 call. While this is a good idea in the event of an actual crisis, law enforcement agencies have taken advantage of this technology to locate and track people in real time. EFF has argued that this was not the intended use of this system and that such use requires a warrant.

What’s more, the mobile phone system itself has a huge number of privacy issues: from mobile malware which can control your camera and read encrypted data, to Cell-Site Simulators which can pinpoint a phone’s exact location, to the “Upstream” surveillance program exposed by Edward Snowden, to privacy issues in the SS7 system that connects mobile phone networks to each other. There are myriad privacy issues with mobile devices that we should be deeply concerned about, but the Wireless Emergency Alert system is not one of them.
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More: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/...bile-privacy-presidential-alert-isnt-one-them
 

11C1P

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You know I also wonder how all these drones play into the mass surveillance game, especially since they passed that laws requiring drones to be registered. Many of them are controlled by smart phones. I'd imagine they have a way to tap into those & see whatever the drone is seeing. Between private, corporate (remember all the companies offering drone delivery now or soon to come) as well as various govt. agency & military drones as well as universities that have drone programs means there are a whole lot of potential spies flying around. That's in addition to all the surveillance cams posted everywhere along with cell phone cameras, computer web cams & even cameras in smart T.V.'s. It seems to me 1984 is upon us & big brother is watching, listening & reading. Hi big bro/deep state! :wave:
 

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Today the US Transportation Security Administration released a detailed TSA Biometric Roadmap for Aviation Security & the Passenger Experience, making explicit the goal of requiring mug shots (to be used for automated facial recognition and image-based surveillance and control) as a condition of all domestic or international air travel.

This makes explicit the goal that has been apparent, but only implicit, in the activities and statements of both government agencies and airline and airport trade associations.

It’s a terrifyingly totalitarian vision of pervasive surveillance of air travelers at, quite literally and deliberately, every step of their journey, enabled by automated facial recognition and by the seamless collaboration of airlines and airport operators that will help the government surveil their customers ...
More: https://papersplease.org/wp/2018/10...all-commercial-aviation-travelers/#more-12947
 

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Passengers at some European airports will soon be questioned by artificial intelligence-powered lie detectors at border checkpoints, as a European Union trial of the technology is set to begin.

Fliers will be asked a series of travel-related questions by a virtual border guard avatar, and artificial intelligence will monitor their faces to assess whether they are lying.
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The €4.5 million ($5.1 million) project, called iBorderCtrl, will be tested this month at airports in Hungary, Latvia and Greece on passengers traveling from outside the EU, with the aim of reducing congestion.

"It will ask the person to confirm their name, age and date of birth, (and) it will ask them things like what the purpose of their trip is and who is funding the trip," said Crockett.
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The technology has been tested in its current form on only 32 people, and scientists behind the project are hoping to achieve an 85% success rate.
...
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/ai-lie-detector-eu-airports-scli-intl/index.html

If this "lie detector" thing sticks, it will be spread and it will serve a dual purpose in facial recognition surveillance (see post above). It's only a matter of time.
 

rblong2us

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And all justified by suggesting it will identify illegal / unregistered people, so whats not to like .......
Presumably soon to be installed in all police patrol vehicles so they can have due cause to stop and search .......

The wearing of face coverings will need to be made illegal
no burka or V (for Vendetta) masks

hmmmmm
 

pmbug

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Delta says the Atlanta airport’s Terminal F has become the “first biometric terminal” in the United States where passengers can use facial recognition technology “from curb to gate.”

And Delta has already announced plans to offer the technology at another of its hubs: Detroit.
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How will it work?

Delta says customers enter their passport information during online check-in. Or, at the airport, customers can scan their passport to check in. Next, passengers can click “look” as they check in at one of Delta’s automated kiosks. Travelers' face scans will be matched to passport or visa photos on file with U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Delta says customers have the same option as they “approach the camera at the counter in the lobby, the TSA checkpoint or when boarding at the gate.”
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“Nearly all 25,000 customers who travel through ATL Terminal F each week are choosing this optional process, with less than 2 percent opting out,” Delta said in a statement. “And, based on initial data, the facial recognition option is saving an average of two seconds for each customer at boarding, or nine minutes when boarding a wide body aircraft.”

Delta plans to make its Detroit hub the next of its terminals to get the “curb to gate” biometric option.
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https://www.usatoday.com/story/trav...terminal-ready-go-atlanta-airport/2145655002/

We live in a nation of morons. Willingly submitting to the biometric mark of the beast for a paltry two seconds of convenience.
 

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Update, 12/6: The bill has now passed after the Labor party agreed to drop its proposed amendments — you can read full details of the bill here.
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Australia’s controversial anti-encryption bill is one step closer to becoming law, after the two leading but sparring party political giants struck a deal to pass the legislation.

The bill, in short, grants Australian police greater powers to issue “technical notices” — a nice way of forcing companies — even websites — operating in Australia to help the government hack, implant malware, undermine encryption or insert backdoors at the behest of the government.

If companies refuse, they could face financial penalties.
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In all, the proposed provisions have been widely panned by experts, who argue that the bill is vague and contradictory, but powerful, and still contains “dangerous loopholes.” And, opponents warn (as they have for years) that any technical backdoors that allow the government to access end-to-end encrypted messages could be exploited by hackers.
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But the rhetoric isn’t likely to dampen the rush by the global surveillance pact — the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, known as the so-called “Five Eyes” group of nations — to push for greater access to encrypted data. Only earlier this year, the governmental coalition said in no uncertain terms that it would force backdoors if companies weren’t willing to help their governments spy.

Of the Five Eyes, the U.K. was first with its 2016-ratified Investigatory Powers Act, a controversial law that critics dubbed the “snoopers’ charter.” The European Court of Human Rights later found that parts of the surveillance powers violated human rights laws — including obtaining communications data directly from providers.

Near-identical powers proposed by Australia’s draft bill, much in the U.K.’s shadows, however, aren’t covered under European law — and are likely to escape any international legal challenge.
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https://techcrunch.com/2018/12/05/a...ngerous-anti-encryption-bill-into-parliament/
 

pmbug

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Mastercard (NYSE: MA) and Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) today announced a strategic collaboration to improve how people manage and use their digital identity.

Currently, verifying your identity online is still dependent on physical or digital proof managed by a central party, whether it’s your passport number, your proof of address, driver’s license, user credentials or other means. This dependence places a huge burden on individuals, who have to successfully remember hundreds of passwords for various identities and are increasingly being subjected to more complexity in proving their identity and managing their data. Working together, Mastercard and Microsoft aim to give people a secure, instant way to verify their digital identity with whomever they want, whenever they want.

The answer to these challenges is a service that would allow individuals to enter, control and share their identity data their way–on the devices they use every day. That’s Mastercard’s intention, working closely with players like Microsoft.
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https://newsroom.mastercard.com/pre...igital-identity-innovations/#__prclt=IarCgTyK

I'm sure they would never abuse the data they collect on their customers...
 

pmbug

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From a month ago (I just found it):
The US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) have hidden an undisclosed number of covert surveillance cameras inside streetlights around the country, federal contracting documents reveal.

According to government procurement data, the DEA has paid a Houston, Texas company called Cowboy Streetlight Concealments LLC roughly $22,000 since June 2018 for “video recording and reproducing equipment.” ICE paid out about $28,000 to Cowboy Streetlight Concealments over the same period of time.

It’s unclear where the DEA and ICE streetlight cameras have been installed, or where the next deployments will take place. ...

Christie Crawford, who owns Cowboy Streetlight Concealments with her husband, a Houston police officer, said she was not at liberty to discuss the company’s federal contracts in detail.

“We do streetlight concealments and camera enclosures,” Crawford told Quartz. “Basically, there’s businesses out there that will build concealments for the government and that’s what we do. They specify what’s best for them, and we make it. And that’s about all I can probably say.”

However, she added: “I can tell you this—things are always being watched. It doesn’t matter if you’re driving down the street or visiting a friend, if government or law enforcement has a reason to set up surveillance, there’s great technology out there to do it.”
...
https://qz.com/1458475/the-dea-and-ice-are-hiding-surveillance-cameras-in-streetlights/
 

pmbug

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Thanks to Edward Snowden, we know the extent to which major corporations are compromised by the NSA - essentially doing the domestic surveillance work that govco can't constitutionally do itself. With that in mind...

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According to a new report, the patent application, made available in late November, would pair facial surveillance such as Rekognition, the product that Amazon is aggressively marketing to law enforcement, with Ring – a doorbell camera company that Amazon acquired in 2018.
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https://www.theorganicprepper.com/amazons-facial-recognition-doorbell/
 

pmbug

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Artificial fingerprints have been developed by researchers who say they could one day be used to hack into everyday devices.

Researchers from New York University and Michigan State University successfully generated what they call "DeepMasterPrints" earlier this year. These are machine-learning methods that act as a kind of "masterkey" which, the researchers claim, have the potential to unlock around one in three fingerprint-protected smartphones.
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https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/28/res...prints-could-hack-a-third-of-smartphones.html

I actually think this is a positive development. As it becomes known that biometric locks (at least finger print for now) are not secure, they will stop being used.
 

rblong2us

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Arguably any data that involves electronic storage and retrieval is vulnerable to hacking.

Im still pondering how we might be able to prove beyond doubt that we are the human we claim to be.
 

pmbug

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Google is a front end data miner for the NSA, et. al. You can rest assured that while corporate customers get "de-identified" data, the NSA et.al. have access to the full database...

... A new initiative from Sidewalk Labs, the city-building subsidiary of Google’s parent company Alphabet, has set out to change that.

The program, known as Replica, offers planning agencies the ability to model an entire city’s patterns of movement. Like “SimCity,” Replica’s “user-friendly” tool deploys statistical simulations to give a comprehensive view of how, when, and where people travel in urban areas. It’s an appealing prospect for planners making critical decisions about transportation and land use. In recent months, transportation authorities in Kansas City, Portland, and the Chicago area have signed up to glean its insights. The only catch: They’re not completely sure where the data is coming from.

Typical urban planners rely on processes like surveys and trip counters that are often time-consuming, labor-intensive, and outdated. Replica, instead, uses real-time mobile location data. As Nick Bowden of Sidewalk Labs has explained, “Replica provides a full set of baseline travel measures that are very difficult to gather and maintain today, including the total number of people on a highway or local street network, what mode they’re using (car, transit, bike, or foot), and their trip purpose (commuting to work, going shopping, heading to school).”

To make these measurements, the program gathers and de-identifies the location of cellphone users, which it obtains from unspecified third-party vendors. It then models this anonymized data in simulations — creating a synthetic population that faithfully replicates a city’s real-world patterns but that “obscures the real-world travel habits of individual people,” as Bowden told The Intercept.

The program comes at a time of growing unease with how tech companies use and share our personal data — and raises new questions about Google’s encroachment on the physical world.

Last month, the New York Times revealed how sensitive location data is harvested by third parties from our smartphones — often with weak or nonexistent consent provisions. A Motherboard investigation in early January further demonstrated how cell companies sell our locations to stalkers and bounty hunters willing to pay the price.

For some, the Google sibling’s plans to gather and commodify real-time location data from millions of cellphones adds to these concerns. “The privacy concerns are pretty extreme,” Ben Green, an urban technology expert and author of “The Smart Enough City,” wrote in an email to The Intercept. “Mobile phone location data is extremely sensitive.” These privacy concerns have been far from theoretical. An Associated Press investigation showed that Google’s apps and website track people even after they have disabled the location history on their phones. Quartz found that Google was tracking Android users by collecting the addresses of nearby cellphone towers even if all location services were turned off. The company has also been caught using its Street View vehicles to collect the Wi-Fi location data from phones and computers.
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More: https://theintercept.com/2019/01/28/google-alphabet-sidewalk-labs-replica-cellphone-data/
 

ancona

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Working out at the Space center, we all have smart badges. These things have RFID technology in them that track our movements down to around three inches. Security can form a map of your whereabouts at any time and do so in real-time. They can and do watch people to track their movements in and around the station when they are unsure of their intentions, especially if they are foreign nationals.
 
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